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Article

Exploring the Diagnostic Accuracy of the KidFit Screening Tool for Identifying Children with Health and Motor Performance-Related Fitness Impairments: A Feasibility Study

1
Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast 4226, Australia
2
Department of Paediatrics, Nepean Blue Mountains Family Metabolic Health and Paediatric Diabetes Services, Nepean Hospital and the Nepean Charles Perkins Centre Research Hub, Kingswood 2747, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 995; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030995
Received: 18 December 2019 / Revised: 26 January 2020 / Accepted: 2 February 2020 / Published: 5 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adolescent and Young People's Health Issues and Challenges)
Child obesity is associated with poor health and reduced motor skills. This study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the KidFit Screening Tool for identifying children with overweight/obesity, reduced motor skills and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness. Fifty-seven children (mean age: 12.57 ± 1.82 years; male/female: 34/23) were analysed. The Speed and Agility Motor Screen (SAMS) and the Modified Shuttle Test-Paeds (MSTP) made up the KidFit Screening Tool. Motor Proficiency (BOT2) (Total and Gross) was also measured. BMI, peak-oxygen-uptake (VO2peak) were measured with a representative sub-sample (n = 25). Strong relationships existed between the independent variables included in the KidFit Screening Tool and; BMI (R2 = 0.779, p < 0.001); Gross Motor Proficiency (R2 = 0.612, p < 0.001) and VO2peak (mL/kg/min) (R2 = 0.754, p < 0.001). The KidFit Screening Tool has a correct classification rate of 0.84 for overweight/obesity, 0.77 for motor proficiency and 0.88 for cardiorespiratory fitness. The sensitivity and specificity of the KidFit Screening Tool for identifying children with overweight/obesity was 100% (SE = 0.00) and 78.95%, respectively (SE = 0.09), motor skills in the lowest quartile was 90% (SE = 0.095) and 74.47% (SE = 0.064), respectively, and poor cardiorespiratory fitness was 100% (SE = 0.00) and 82.35% (SE = 0.093), respectively. The KidFit Screening Tool has a strong relationship with health- and performance-related fitness, is accurate for identifying children with health- and performance-related fitness impairments and may assist in informing referral decisions for detailed clinical investigations. View Full-Text
Keywords: KidFit; screening; health; fitness; motor proficiency; children; obesity KidFit; screening; health; fitness; motor proficiency; children; obesity
MDPI and ACS Style

Milne, N.; M Leong, G.; Hing, W. Exploring the Diagnostic Accuracy of the KidFit Screening Tool for Identifying Children with Health and Motor Performance-Related Fitness Impairments: A Feasibility Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 995. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030995

AMA Style

Milne N, M Leong G, Hing W. Exploring the Diagnostic Accuracy of the KidFit Screening Tool for Identifying Children with Health and Motor Performance-Related Fitness Impairments: A Feasibility Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(3):995. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030995

Chicago/Turabian Style

Milne, Nikki, Gary M Leong, and Wayne Hing. 2020. "Exploring the Diagnostic Accuracy of the KidFit Screening Tool for Identifying Children with Health and Motor Performance-Related Fitness Impairments: A Feasibility Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 3: 995. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030995

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