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Article

The Epidemiology of Skin Cancer and Public Health Strategies for Its Prevention in Southern Africa

1
Environment and Health Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2
Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
3
LACy, Laboratoire de l’Atmosphère et des Cyclones (UMR 8105 CNRS, Université de La Réunion, Météo-France), 97744 Saint-Denis de La Réunion, France
4
Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Edinburgh EH8 9AG UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031017
Received: 17 December 2019 / Revised: 22 January 2020 / Accepted: 23 January 2020 / Published: 6 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sun Exposure and Vitamin D for Public Health)
Skin cancer is a non-communicable disease that has been underexplored in Africa, including Southern Africa. Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is an important, potentially modifiable risk factor for skin cancer. The countries which comprise Southern Africa are Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland. They differ in population size and composition and experience different levels of solar UVR. Here, the epidemiology and prevalence of skin cancer in Southern African countries are outlined. Information is provided on skin cancer prevention campaigns in these countries, and evidence sought to support recommendations for skin cancer prevention, especially for people with fair skin, or oculocutaneous albinism or HIV-AIDS who are at the greatest risk. Consideration is given to the possible impacts of climate change on skin cancer in Southern Africa and the need for adaptation and human behavioural change is emphasized. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; environmental health; HIV/AIDS; keratinocyte cancer; melanoma; oculocutaneous albinism; public health; sun exposure climate change; environmental health; HIV/AIDS; keratinocyte cancer; melanoma; oculocutaneous albinism; public health; sun exposure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wright, C.Y.; du Preez, D.J.; Millar, D.A.; Norval, M. The Epidemiology of Skin Cancer and Public Health Strategies for Its Prevention in Southern Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1017. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031017

AMA Style

Wright CY, du Preez DJ, Millar DA, Norval M. The Epidemiology of Skin Cancer and Public Health Strategies for Its Prevention in Southern Africa. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(3):1017. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031017

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wright, Caradee Y., D. J. du Preez, Danielle A. Millar, and Mary Norval. 2020. "The Epidemiology of Skin Cancer and Public Health Strategies for Its Prevention in Southern Africa" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 3: 1017. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031017

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