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Consumption of a Beverage Containing Aspartame and Acesulfame K for Two Weeks Does Not Adversely Influence Glucose Metabolism in Adult Males and Females: A Randomized Crossover Study

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea
2
UniSA Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239049
Received: 12 November 2020 / Revised: 30 November 2020 / Accepted: 2 December 2020 / Published: 4 December 2020
There is an association between the consumption of artificial sweeteners and Type 2 diabetes in cohort studies, but intervention studies do not show a clear elevation of blood glucose after the use of artificial sweeteners. The objective of this study was to examine whether two commonly used artificial sweeteners had an adverse effect on glucose control in normal-weight subjects, and in overweight and obese subjects when consumed for 2 weeks. In the study, 39 healthy subjects (body-mass index, kg/m2) (18–45) without Type 2 diabetes with an age of 18–75 years were randomly assigned to 0.6 L/day of an artificially sweetened soft drink containing acesulfame K (950) and aspartame (951) or 0.6 L/day of mineral water for 2 weeks each in a crossover study. There was a 4 week washout period with no drinks consumed. Glucose levels were read by a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) during each 2 week period. A 75 g oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at the beginning and end of each intervention period. Blood samples were collected at baseline, and 1 and 2 h for glucose and insulin. A 2 week intake of artificially sweetened beverage (ASB) did not alter concentrations of fasting glucose and fasting insulin, the area under the curve (AUC) for OGTT glucose and insulin, the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for OGTT glucose and insulin, the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the Matsuda index compared with the baseline and with the changes after a 2 week intake of mineral water. Continuous 2 week glucose concentrations were not significantly different after a 2 week intake of ASB compared with a 2 week intake of mineral water. This study found no harmful effect of the artificially sweetened soft drink containing acesulfame K (950) and aspartame (951) on glucose control when consumed for 2 weeks by people without Type 2 diabetes. View Full-Text
Keywords: artificial sweetener; glucose; insulin; continuous glucose monitoring artificial sweetener; glucose; insulin; continuous glucose monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, Y.; Keogh, J.B.; Clifton, P.M. Consumption of a Beverage Containing Aspartame and Acesulfame K for Two Weeks Does Not Adversely Influence Glucose Metabolism in Adult Males and Females: A Randomized Crossover Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9049. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239049

AMA Style

Kim Y, Keogh JB, Clifton PM. Consumption of a Beverage Containing Aspartame and Acesulfame K for Two Weeks Does Not Adversely Influence Glucose Metabolism in Adult Males and Females: A Randomized Crossover Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(23):9049. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239049

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B.; Clifton, Peter M. 2020. "Consumption of a Beverage Containing Aspartame and Acesulfame K for Two Weeks Does Not Adversely Influence Glucose Metabolism in Adult Males and Females: A Randomized Crossover Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 23: 9049. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239049

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