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Parental Stress and Family Quality of Life: Surveying Family Members of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

1
INICO/Faculty of Psychology, Universidad de Salamanca, 37005 Salamanca, Spain
2
Faculty of Psychology, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Faculty of Education, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Viña del Mar 1290, Chile
4
Faculty of Nursing, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí 78240, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9007; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239007
Received: 2 November 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 28 November 2020 / Published: 3 December 2020
(1) Background. This study assesses the quality of life in families with a member with an intellectual disability using the Family Adjustment and Adaptation Response framework. (2) Methods. The study included 515 Spanish participants whose family members with disabilities range in age from infancy to adulthood. We hypothesized that it is possible to predict parenting stress by paying attention to the meaning families give to themselves and their circumstances while controlling for the impact of other variables such as family capabilities and characteristics of the family member with disabilities. We used the Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale and the section on Exceptional needs of medical and behavioral support from the Supports Intensity Scale, together with other potential predictors. The subscale on parental stress from the Parenting Stress Index–Short Form was utilized as a criterion measure. (3) Results. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that 49% of parental stress was predicted by dysfunctional interaction, difficult behaviors, low emotional wellbeing, poor family interaction, as well as kinship as parents, and the severity of both the medical needs and intellectual disability. (4) Conclusions. The stress experienced by those families is mostly predicted by the meaning they give to themselves and their circumstances. Implications of these findings for service delivery are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: intellectual disability; Parenting Stress Index–Short Form; parental stress; family quality of life; Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale intellectual disability; Parenting Stress Index–Short Form; parental stress; family quality of life; Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jenaro, C.; Flores, N.; Gutiérrez-Bermejo, B.; Vega, V.; Pérez, C.; Cruz, M. Parental Stress and Family Quality of Life: Surveying Family Members of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9007. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239007

AMA Style

Jenaro C, Flores N, Gutiérrez-Bermejo B, Vega V, Pérez C, Cruz M. Parental Stress and Family Quality of Life: Surveying Family Members of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(23):9007. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239007

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jenaro, Cristina; Flores, Noelia; Gutiérrez-Bermejo, Belén; Vega, Vanessa; Pérez, Carmen; Cruz, Maribel. 2020. "Parental Stress and Family Quality of Life: Surveying Family Members of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 23: 9007. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239007

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