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Response to Buonocore et al. Comments on Wendt Hess et al. “Assessing Agreement in Exposure Classification between Proximity-Based Metrics and Air Monitoring Data in Epidemiology Studies of Unconventional Resource Development.” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3055
Open AccessArticle

Self-Reported General Health, Overall and Work-Related Stress, Loneliness, and Sleeping Problems in 335,625 Swedish Adults from 2000 to 2016

1
Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, 114 33 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Division of Insurance medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
3
The Research Dept, HPI Health Profile Institute AB, 182 53 Stockholm, Sweden
4
Department of Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 511; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020511
Received: 4 December 2019 / Revised: 7 January 2020 / Accepted: 10 January 2020 / Published: 14 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Mental Health)
The prevalence of poor health, in particular stress-related mental ill-health, is increasing over time and birth cohorts. As rapid societal changes have occurred in the last decade and still are occurring, there is an interest in investigating the trends in health-related factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate trends in self-reported general health, overall stress, work-related stress, feelings of loneliness, and sleeping problems in 335,625 Swedish adults across categories of gender, geographic regions, length of education, and age from 2000 to 2016. On population level, sleeping problems and poor general health have increased markedly and significantly, while experiences of work stress decreased between 2000 and 2016 (p < 0.05). Overall stress and level of loneliness were unchanged (p > 0.05). The risk of having ≥3 symptoms (any of poor or very poor general health, often or very often perceived overall stress, loneliness, or sleeping problems) has increased significantly from 2000 to 2016 (ß = 1034 (1027–1040)). This increase was significantly higher in young (ß = 1052 (1038–1065)) and individuals with lower education (ß = 1056 (1037–1076)) compared to older and high length of education. View Full-Text
Keywords: public health; self-reported health; sleeping problems; stress; loneliness; working population public health; self-reported health; sleeping problems; stress; loneliness; working population
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Blom, V.; Kallings, L.V.; Ekblom, B.; Wallin, P.; Andersson, G.; Hemmingsson, E.; Ekblom, Ö.; Söderling, J.; Ekblom Bak, E. Self-Reported General Health, Overall and Work-Related Stress, Loneliness, and Sleeping Problems in 335,625 Swedish Adults from 2000 to 2016. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 511.

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