Next Article in Journal
A Random Parameters Ordered Probit Analysis of Injury Severity in Truck Involved Rear-End Collisions
Next Article in Special Issue
Healing Spaces: Designing Physical Environments to Optimize Health, Wellbeing, and Performance
Previous Article in Journal
An Assessment of the Performance of the PLUS+ Tool in Supporting the Evaluation of Water Framework Directive Compliance in Scottish Standing Waters
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Impact of Green Space on Violent Crime in Urban Environments: An Evidence Synthesis
 
 
Communication

Can Exposure to Certain Urban Green Spaces Trigger Frontal Alpha Asymmetry in the Brain?—Preliminary Findings from a Passive Task EEG Study

1
Institute for Health Innovation & Technology (iHealthtech) MD6, 14 Medical Drive, #14-01, Singapore 117599, Singapore
2
NeuroLandscape Foundation, Suwalska 8/78, 03-252 Warsaw, Poland
3
National Parks Board, Centre for Urban Greenery and Ecology, 1E Cluny Road Singapore Botanic Gardens, Singapore 259601, Singapore
4
Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 12 Science Drive 2, Tahir Foundation Building #12, Singapore 117549, Singapore
5
Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, the National University of Singapore, NUHS Tower Block, Level 9 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020394
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 19 December 2019 / Accepted: 3 January 2020 / Published: 7 January 2020
A growing body of evidence from observational and experimental studies shows the associations between exposure to urban green spaces (UGSs) and mental health outcomes. Little is known about which specific features of UGS that might be the most beneficial. In addition, there is potential in utilizing objective physiological markers of mental health, such as assessing brain activity, but the subject requires further investigation. This paper presents the preliminary findings from an on-going within-subject experiment where adult participants (n = 22; 13 females) were passively exposed to six landscape scenes within two UGSs (a park and a neighborhood green space) and three scenes of a busy urban downtown (control site). The landscape scenes were pre-selected based on their contemplative landscape score (CLS) to represent different levels of aggregation of contemplative features within each view. Participants went to each of the sites in a random order to passively view the scenes, while their electroencephalography (EEG) signal was being recorded concurrently. Frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) values, commonly associated with the approach-related motivation and positive emotions, were extracted. The preliminary results show trends for the main effect of site on FAA, suggestive of stronger FAA in park compared to the control site, akin to more positive mood. There was also a trend for the interaction between the site and scene, which suggests that even within the individual sites, there is variability depending on the specific scene. Adjusting for environmental covariate strengthened these effects, these interim findings are promising in supporting the study hypothesis and suggest that exposure to urban green spaces may be linked to mental health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban; landscape; brain; visual; green; contemplative; mental health; well-being; FAA; EEG; UGS; depression urban; landscape; brain; visual; green; contemplative; mental health; well-being; FAA; EEG; UGS; depression
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Olszewska-Guizzo, A.; Sia, A.; Fogel, A.; Ho, R. Can Exposure to Certain Urban Green Spaces Trigger Frontal Alpha Asymmetry in the Brain?—Preliminary Findings from a Passive Task EEG Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 394. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020394

AMA Style

Olszewska-Guizzo A, Sia A, Fogel A, Ho R. Can Exposure to Certain Urban Green Spaces Trigger Frontal Alpha Asymmetry in the Brain?—Preliminary Findings from a Passive Task EEG Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(2):394. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020394

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olszewska-Guizzo, Agnieszka, Angelia Sia, Anna Fogel, and Roger Ho. 2020. "Can Exposure to Certain Urban Green Spaces Trigger Frontal Alpha Asymmetry in the Brain?—Preliminary Findings from a Passive Task EEG Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 2: 394. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020394

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop