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Open AccessArticle

Strategies to Connect Low-Income Communities with the Proposed Sewerage Network of the Dhaka Sanitation Improvement Project, Bangladesh: A Qualitative Assessment of the Perspectives of Stakeholders

1
Environmental Interventions Unit, Infectious Disease Division, icddr,b, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh
2
Department of Civil Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
3
Institute of Statistical Research and Training, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
4
Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (DWASA), Dhaka 1215, Bangladesh
5
Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP), London ECV4 6AL, UK
6
Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
7
World Vision Inc., Washington, DC 20002, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Contributed equally to the first author.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7201; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197201
Received: 31 August 2020 / Revised: 22 September 2020 / Accepted: 28 September 2020 / Published: 1 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The World in Crisis: Current Health Issues)
In Bangladesh, approximately 31% of urban residents are living without safely managed sanitation, the majority of whom are slum residents. To improve the situation, Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (DWASA) is implementing the Dhaka Sanitation Improvement Project (DSIP), mostly funded by the World Bank. This study assessed the challenges and opportunities of bringing low-income communities (LICs) under a sewerage connection within the proposed sewerage network plan by 2025. We conducted nine key-informant interviews from DWASA and City Corporation, and 23 focus-group discussions with landlords, tenants, and Community Based Organisations (CBOs) from 16 LICs near the proposed catchment area. To achieve connections, LICs would require improved toilet infrastructures and have to be connected to main roads. Construction of large communal septic tanks is also required where individual toilet connections are difficult. To encourage connection in LICs, income-based or area-based subsidies were recommended. For financing maintenance, respondents suggested monthly fee collection for management of the infrastructure by dividing bills equally among sharing households, or by users per household. Participants also suggested the government’s cooperation with development-partners/NGOs to ensure sewerage connection construction, operation, and maintenance and prerequisite policy changes such as assuring land tenure. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban sanitation; sewerage network; sewerage connection; low-income community; slum; DSIP; affordability; Dhaka; Bangladesh urban sanitation; sewerage network; sewerage connection; low-income community; slum; DSIP; affordability; Dhaka; Bangladesh
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Alam, M.-U.; Sharior, F.; Ferdous, S.; Ahsan, A.; Ahmed, T.; Afrin, A.; Sarker, S.; Akand, F.; Archie, R.J.; Hasan, K.; Renouf, R.; Drabble, S.; Norman, G.; Rahman, M.; Tidwell, J.B. Strategies to Connect Low-Income Communities with the Proposed Sewerage Network of the Dhaka Sanitation Improvement Project, Bangladesh: A Qualitative Assessment of the Perspectives of Stakeholders. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7201.

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