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The Evolution Road of Seaweed Aquaculture: Cultivation Technologies and the Industry 4.0

1
Department of Life Sciences, Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre (MARE), University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
2
LEPABE—Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
3
Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6528; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186528
Received: 31 July 2020 / Revised: 31 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 8 September 2020
Seaweeds (marine macroalgae) are autotrophic organisms capable of producing many compounds of interest. For a long time, seaweeds have been seen as a great nutritional resource, primarily in Asian countries to later gain importance in Europe and South America, as well as in North America and Australia. It has been reported that edible seaweeds are rich in proteins, lipids and dietary fibers. Moreover, they have plenty of bioactive molecules that can be applied in nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic areas. There are historical registers of harvest and cultivation of seaweeds but with the increment of the studies of seaweeds and their valuable compounds, their aquaculture has increased. The methodology of cultivation varies from onshore to offshore. Seaweeds can also be part of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA), which has great opportunities but is also very challenging to the farmers. This multidisciplinary field applied to the seaweed aquaculture is very promising to improve the methods and techniques; this area is developed under the denominated industry 4.0. View Full-Text
Keywords: seaweed; healthy benefits; aquaculture; offshore; onshore; IMTA; compounds; industry 4.0 seaweed; healthy benefits; aquaculture; offshore; onshore; IMTA; compounds; industry 4.0
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MDPI and ACS Style

García-Poza, S.; Leandro, A.; Cotas, C.; Cotas, J.; Marques, J.C.; Pereira, L.; Gonçalves, A.M.M. The Evolution Road of Seaweed Aquaculture: Cultivation Technologies and the Industry 4.0. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6528. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186528

AMA Style

García-Poza S, Leandro A, Cotas C, Cotas J, Marques JC, Pereira L, Gonçalves AMM. The Evolution Road of Seaweed Aquaculture: Cultivation Technologies and the Industry 4.0. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(18):6528. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186528

Chicago/Turabian Style

García-Poza, Sara; Leandro, Adriana; Cotas, Carla; Cotas, João; Marques, João C.; Pereira, Leonel; Gonçalves, Ana M.M. 2020. "The Evolution Road of Seaweed Aquaculture: Cultivation Technologies and the Industry 4.0" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 18: 6528. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186528

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