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Open AccessReview

The Case for Comorbid Myofascial Pain—A Qualitative Review

Institute for Pain Medicine, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel Rappaport School of Medicine, Technion Institute of Technology, Haifa 31096, Israel
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5188; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145188
Received: 2 May 2020 / Revised: 7 July 2020 / Accepted: 8 July 2020 / Published: 17 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain and Headache)
Myofascial pain syndrome is widely considered to be among the most prevalent pain conditions, both in the community and in specialized pain clinics. While myofascial pain often arises in otherwise healthy individuals, evidence is mounting that its prevalence may be even higher in individuals with various comorbidities. Comorbid myofascial pain has been observed in a wide variety of medical conditions, including malignant tumors, osteoarthritis, neurological conditions, and mental health conditions. Here, we review the evidence of comorbid myofascial pain and discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of its recognition. View Full-Text
Keywords: myofascial pain syndrome; comorbid pain; chronic pain; secondary pain myofascial pain syndrome; comorbid pain; chronic pain; secondary pain
MDPI and ACS Style

Vulfsons, S.; Minerbi, A. The Case for Comorbid Myofascial Pain—A Qualitative Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5188.

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