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Article

Association between Prenatal Exposure to Household Pesticides and Neonatal Weight and Length Growth in the Japan Environment and Children’s Study

1
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 4678601, Japan
2
Graduate School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University, Inzai, Chiba 2701695, Japan
3
Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 4678601, Japan
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 4678601, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The group member is in the Appendix A.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4608; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124608
Received: 27 May 2020 / Revised: 18 June 2020 / Accepted: 22 June 2020 / Published: 26 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Children's Health)
The effects of prenatal exposure to household pesticides on fetal and neonatal growth have not been fully clarified. The present study aims to determine the effects of prenatal exposure to pesticides on neonates’ body size and growth during the first month. This study included 93,718 pairs of pregnant women and their children from the Japan Environment and Children’s Study. Participants completed self-reporting questionnaires during their second or third trimesters on their demographic characteristics and frequency of pesticide use during pregnancy. Child weight, length, and sex were obtained from medical record transcripts. Birth weight and length, as well as weight and length changes over the first month, were estimated using an analysis of covariance. Frequency of exposure to almost all pesticides had no effects on birth weight and length. However, we found small but significant associations (i) between the use of fumigation insecticides and decreased birth weight, and (ii) between frequencies of exposure to pyrethroid pesticides, especially mosquito coils/mats, and suppression of neonatal length growth. Prenatal exposure to household pesticides, especially those containing pyrethroids, might adversely influence fetal and postnatal growth trajectories. View Full-Text
Keywords: pesticides; pregnancy; children; birth weight; birth length; JECS pesticides; pregnancy; children; birth weight; birth length; JECS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Matsuki, T.; Ebara, T.; Tamada, H.; Ito, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Kano, H.; Kurihara, T.; Sato, H.; Kato, S.; Saitoh, S.; Sugiura-Ogasawara, M.; Kamijima, M.; The Japan Environment and Children’s Study Group. Association between Prenatal Exposure to Household Pesticides and Neonatal Weight and Length Growth in the Japan Environment and Children’s Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4608. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124608

AMA Style

Matsuki T, Ebara T, Tamada H, Ito Y, Yamada Y, Kano H, Kurihara T, Sato H, Kato S, Saitoh S, Sugiura-Ogasawara M, Kamijima M, The Japan Environment and Children’s Study Group. Association between Prenatal Exposure to Household Pesticides and Neonatal Weight and Length Growth in the Japan Environment and Children’s Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(12):4608. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124608

Chicago/Turabian Style

Matsuki, Taro, Takeshi Ebara, Hazuki Tamada, Yuki Ito, Yasuyuki Yamada, Hirohisa Kano, Takahiro Kurihara, Hirotaka Sato, Sayaka Kato, Shinji Saitoh, Mayumi Sugiura-Ogasawara, Michihiro Kamijima, and The Japan Environment and Children’s Study Group. 2020. "Association between Prenatal Exposure to Household Pesticides and Neonatal Weight and Length Growth in the Japan Environment and Children’s Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 12: 4608. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124608

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