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Concept Paper

Art Meets Sport: What Can Actor Training Bring to Physical Literacy Programs?

1
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
2
School of Communication and Creative Arts, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
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School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4067, Australia
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Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (RISE), Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, University Drive, Bruce 2617, Australia
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School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
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Centre for Sports, Exercise and Life Sciences (CSELS), Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK
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Macquarie School of Education, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4497; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124497
Received: 22 May 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 14 June 2020 / Published: 23 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Literacy in Children and Youth)
The aim of this communication is to highlight synergies and opportunities between the fields of education, sport and health and the performing arts for the promotion of physical literacy. First, physical literacy is introduced and then defined according to the definition used in this communication. Secondly, we highlight the gap in physical literacy interventions, in that they do not address learning based on a holistic comprehensive definition of physical literacy. Then we provide examples of interventions that do borrow from the arts, such as circus arts, and show how these approaches explicitly link to the discipline of arts. This is followed by program examples, which approach motor and language development from discipline-specific perspectives. Then we introduce actor training (within the discipline of arts) in terms of how this approach may be useful to our understanding of physical literacy and how to expand the conception of physical literacy to include affective meaning making, and tolerance for ambiguity and discomfort in not-knowing. Finally, we conclude with the next step for the bridging of disciplines in order to further our journey to understand and improve physical literacy. View Full-Text
Keywords: child; physical education; actor training; theatre; performance; performing art child; physical education; actor training; theatre; performance; performing art
MDPI and ACS Style

Barnett, L.M.; Dennis, R.; Hunter, K.; Cairney, J.; Keegan, R.J.; Essiet, I.A.; Dudley, D.A. Art Meets Sport: What Can Actor Training Bring to Physical Literacy Programs? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4497. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124497

AMA Style

Barnett LM, Dennis R, Hunter K, Cairney J, Keegan RJ, Essiet IA, Dudley DA. Art Meets Sport: What Can Actor Training Bring to Physical Literacy Programs? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(12):4497. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124497

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barnett, Lisa M., Rea Dennis, Kate Hunter, John Cairney, Richard J. Keegan, Inimfon A. Essiet, and Dean A. Dudley 2020. "Art Meets Sport: What Can Actor Training Bring to Physical Literacy Programs?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 12: 4497. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124497

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