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Article

Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes Smartphone App for Reducing Prolonged Sitting Time in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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Division of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences, Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK
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Centre for Human Performance, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Brunel University London, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK
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Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research, School of Sport Science and Physical Activity, University of Bedfordshire, Polhill Avenue, Bedford MK41 9EA, UK
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Department of Computer and Information Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XH, UK
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Institute for Research in Applicable Computing, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4414; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124414
Received: 15 May 2020 / Revised: 8 June 2020 / Accepted: 13 June 2020 / Published: 19 June 2020
This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a self-regulation smartphone app for reducing prolonged sitting in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This was a two-arm, randomised, controlled feasibility trial. The intervention group used the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes smartphone app for 8 weeks. The app uses a number of behaviour change techniques aimed at reducing and breaking up sitting time. Eligibility, recruitment, retention, and completion rates for the outcomes (sitting, standing, stepping, and health-related measures) assessed trial feasibility. Interviews with participants explored intervention acceptability. Participants with T2DM were randomised to the control (n = 10) and intervention groups (n = 10). Recruitment and retention rates were 71% and 90%, respectively. The remaining participants provided 100% of data for the study measures. The MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes app was viewed as acceptable for reducing and breaking up sitting time. There were preliminary improvements in the number of breaks in sitting per day, body fat %, glucose tolerance, attitude, intention, planning, wellbeing, and positive and negative affect in favour of the intervention group. In conclusion, the findings indicate that it would be feasible to deliver and evaluate the efficacy of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes app for breaking up sitting time and improving health outcomes in a full trial. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behaviour; glucose; health apps; behaviour change; theory of planned behaviour; health coaching sedentary behaviour; glucose; health apps; behaviour change; theory of planned behaviour; health coaching
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bailey, D.P.; Mugridge, L.H.; Dong, F.; Zhang, X.; Chater, A.M. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes Smartphone App for Reducing Prolonged Sitting Time in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4414. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124414

AMA Style

Bailey DP, Mugridge LH, Dong F, Zhang X, Chater AM. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes Smartphone App for Reducing Prolonged Sitting Time in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(12):4414. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124414

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bailey, Daniel P., Lucie H. Mugridge, Feng Dong, Xu Zhang, and Angel M. Chater 2020. "Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes Smartphone App for Reducing Prolonged Sitting Time in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 12: 4414. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124414

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