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Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS): Faults and Implications

by Michiel Tack
Independent researcher, Sint-Laurentiusstraat 87, 9700 Oudenaarde, Belgium
Independent researcher.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071247
Received: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
The classification of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) could have negative consequences for patients with functional somatic syndromes (FSS). By grouping related but distinct syndromes into one label, the MUS classification fails to inform clinicians about their patients’ health condition. In research settings, the MUS classification makes patient samples more heterogeneous, obstructing research into the underlying pathology of FSS. Long-term studies have shown that MUS are often appraised as medically explained symptoms at follow-up and vice versa, raising doubts about the reliability of this distinction. View Full-Text
Keywords: medically unexplained symptoms (MUS); functional somatic syndromes (FSS); chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); fibromyalgia; somatic symptom disorder (SSD) medically unexplained symptoms (MUS); functional somatic syndromes (FSS); chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); fibromyalgia; somatic symptom disorder (SSD)
MDPI and ACS Style

Tack, M. Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS): Faults and Implications. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1247.

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