Next Article in Journal
Handgrip Strength of World Trade Center (WTC) Responders: The Role of Re-Experiencing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms
Previous Article in Journal
Barriers and Facilitators to Accessing Health Services: A Qualitative Study Amongst People with Disabilities in Cameroon and India
Open AccessArticle

Alcohol Mixed with Energy Drinks (AmED) and Negative Alcohol-Related Consequences among South Korean College Students

1
Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
2
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Ajou University, Suwon 16499, Korea
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071127
Received: 16 February 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 29 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) has been associated with various alcohol-related consequences among college students. However, more information is required to assess how this relationship is affected by sociodemographic and environmental factors. This paper investigates the association between AmED consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences while (1) stratifying AmED users by sex, (2) examining a range of outcomes specific to the college context (e.g., missing class), and (3) controlling for drinking frequency and amount. We surveyed and analyzed the data of 4592 students in a nationally representative sample of 82 colleges in South Korea. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify the association between AmED use and a number of alcohol-related consequences (ranging from a score of 0–12) while adjusting for covariates, including drinking frequency and intake per drinking session. Of our study population, 22.0% of alcohol-consuming men and 13.4% of alcohol-consuming women reported AmED consumption in the past 12 months. AmED users experienced a greater number of alcohol-related consequences (e.g., missing class, engaging in unplanned sexual activity) than non-AmED users (men β: 0.804, p ≤ 0.0001; women β: 0.522, p ≤ 0.0001). Male AmED users consuming alcohol once a month (β: 1.155, p ≤ 0.0001) and female users consuming less than once a month (β: 1.019, p ≤ 0.0001) experienced the greatest number of consequences compared to non-users, as did AmED users consuming 3–4 drinks per drinking session (men β: 1.012, p ≤ 0.0001; women β: 0.993, p ≤ 0.0001). Our findings reveal that both male and female college students who consume AmED experience a greater number of negative alcohol-related consequences than those who do not. Rather than high-risk drinkers, moderate drinkers who consume alcohol infrequently and/or in low amounts may experience more consequences when consumers of AmED. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy drinks; alcohol; risk taking; college drinking; AmED; alcohol-related consequences energy drinks; alcohol; risk taking; college drinking; AmED; alcohol-related consequences
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Oh, S.S.; Ju, Y.J.; Park, E.-C.; Jang, S.-I. Alcohol Mixed with Energy Drinks (AmED) and Negative Alcohol-Related Consequences among South Korean College Students. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1127.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop