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Open AccessArticle

Relationships between Parent-Reported Parenting, Child-Perceived Parenting, and Children’s Mental Health in Taiwanese Children

1
Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow BH12 5BB, UK
2
Department of Social Work, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
3
Department of Social Work, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
4
Department of Social Work, National Taipei University, New Taipei City 23741, Taiwan
5
Department of Nursing, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan
6
Department and Graduate Institute of Forensic Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 1049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061049
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 23 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting and Offspring Health and Well-Being)
The current study examines the relationship between parents’ and children’s reports of parenting and their effects on children’s mental health symptoms. Six hundred and sixty-six parent-child dyads in Taiwan participated in this study. The parents and the children filled out the parenting questionnaires, and the children also reported their general mental health. The results demonstrated that parental-reported and child-perceived parenting were positively correlated, but parents tended to report lower scores on authoritarian parenting and higher scores on Chinese parenting than did their children. There were also significant gender differences: The mothers reported higher authoritative parenting than did the fathers; and the boys perceived higher authoritarian and Chinese-culture specific parenting than did the girls. Moreover, the Chinese parenting had a negative effect on children’s mental health outcomes. Finally, our results showed that children’s perception of parenting had a stronger effect on children’s mental health symptoms than did parental reports on parenting, urging future research to include the children’s report when investigating the effects of parenting on children’s mental health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: parenting; culture; gender differences; child mental health parenting; culture; gender differences; child mental health
MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, C.-Y.; Hsieh, Y.-P.; Shen, A. .-T.; Wei, H.-S.; Feng, J.-Y.; Hwa, H.-L.; Feng, J.Y. Relationships between Parent-Reported Parenting, Child-Perceived Parenting, and Children’s Mental Health in Taiwanese Children. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1049.

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