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Article

Factors Predicting Voluntary and Involuntary Workforce Transitions at Mature Ages: Evidence from HILDA in Australia

by 1,* and 2,*
1
Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
2
College of Finance and Statistics, Hunan University, Changsha 430101, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3769; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193769
Received: 4 July 2019 / Revised: 16 September 2019 / Accepted: 26 September 2019 / Published: 8 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Work Ability and Aging)
The fast population ageing has generated and will continue to generate large social, economic and health challenges in the 21th century in Australia, and many other developed and developing countries. Population ageing is projected to lead to workforce shortages, welfare dependency, fiscal unsustainability, and a higher burden of chronic diseases on health care system. Promoting health and sustainable work capacity among mature age and older workers hence becomes the most important and critical way to address all these challenges. This paper used the pooled data from the longitudinal Household, Incomes and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey 2002–2011 data to investigate common and different factors predicting voluntary or involuntary workforce transitions among workers aged 45 to 64. Long term health conditions and preference to work less hours increased while having a working partner and proportion of paid years decreased both voluntary and involuntary work force transitions. Besides these four common factors, the voluntary and involuntary workforce transitions had very different underlying mechanisms. Our findings suggest that government policies aimed at promoting workforce participation at later life should be directed specifically to life-long health promotion and continuous employment as well as different factors driving voluntary and involuntary workforce transitions, such as life-long training, healthy lifestyles, work flexibility, ageing friendly workplace, and job security. View Full-Text
Keywords: predictors; voluntary; involuntary; workforce transitions; mature ages; Australia predictors; voluntary; involuntary; workforce transitions; mature ages; Australia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gong, C.H.; He, X. Factors Predicting Voluntary and Involuntary Workforce Transitions at Mature Ages: Evidence from HILDA in Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3769. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193769

AMA Style

Gong CH, He X. Factors Predicting Voluntary and Involuntary Workforce Transitions at Mature Ages: Evidence from HILDA in Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(19):3769. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193769

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gong, Cathy H., and Xiaojun He. 2019. "Factors Predicting Voluntary and Involuntary Workforce Transitions at Mature Ages: Evidence from HILDA in Australia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 19: 3769. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193769

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