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Article

Attitudinal Spillover from Misleading Natural Cigarette Marketing: An Experiment Examining Current and Former Smokers’ Support for Tobacco Industry Regulation

1
Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, 3620 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2
Department of Communication, University of Dayton, 300 College Park Ave., Dayton, OH 45469, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3554; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193554
Received: 31 July 2019 / Revised: 13 September 2019 / Accepted: 19 September 2019 / Published: 23 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tobacco Control: Policy Perspectives)
This research examined the influence of natural cigarette advertising on tobacco control policy support, and the potential for misbeliefs arising from exposure to cigarette marketing to affect such support. Ample research indicates that natural cigarettes such as Natural American Spirit (NAS) are widely and erroneously perceived as safer than their traditional counterparts because of their marketed “natural” composition. Yet regulatory action regarding natural cigarette marketing has been limited in scope, and little research has examined whether misleading product advertising affects support for related policy, an important component of the policy process. Here, we administered a large-scale randomized experiment (n = 1128), assigning current and former smokers in the United States to an NAS advertising condition or a control group and assessing their support for tobacco industry regulation. Results show that exposure to NAS advertising reduces support for policies to ban potentially misleading terminology from cigarette advertising, and these effects are stronger for daily smokers. Further, misinformed beliefs about the healthy composition of NAS partially mediate effects on policy support. Yet interestingly, exposure to NAS marketing does not reduce support for policies to establish standards for when certain terms are permissible in cigarette advertising. The results of this analysis indicate potential spillover effects from exposure to NAS advertising in the realm of support for regulatory action pertaining to tobacco industry marketing. View Full-Text
Keywords: tobacco control policies; tobacco regulatory science; natural cigarette marketing tobacco control policies; tobacco regulatory science; natural cigarette marketing
MDPI and ACS Style

Gratale, S.K.; Sangalang, A.; Maloney, E.K.; Cappella, J.N. Attitudinal Spillover from Misleading Natural Cigarette Marketing: An Experiment Examining Current and Former Smokers’ Support for Tobacco Industry Regulation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3554. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193554

AMA Style

Gratale SK, Sangalang A, Maloney EK, Cappella JN. Attitudinal Spillover from Misleading Natural Cigarette Marketing: An Experiment Examining Current and Former Smokers’ Support for Tobacco Industry Regulation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(19):3554. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193554

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gratale, Stefanie K., Angeline Sangalang, Erin K. Maloney, and Joseph N. Cappella 2019. "Attitudinal Spillover from Misleading Natural Cigarette Marketing: An Experiment Examining Current and Former Smokers’ Support for Tobacco Industry Regulation" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 19: 3554. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193554

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