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Perspectives on Disability and Non-Communicable Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, with a Focus on Stroke and Dementia

1
Faculty of Population Health, University College London, 62 Huntley Street, London WC1E 6DD, UK
2
International Centre for Evidence in Disability, Clinical Research Department, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3488; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183488
Received: 30 July 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 16 September 2019 / Published: 19 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disabilities, Health and Well-being)
Non-communicable diseases (NCD) and disability are both common, and increasing in magnitude, as a result of population ageing and a shift in disease burden towards chronic conditions. Moreover, disability and NCDs are strongly linked in a two-way association. People living with NCDs may develop impairments, which can cause activity limitations and participation restriction in the absence of supportive personal and environmental factors. In other words, NCDs may lead to disabilities. At the same time, people with disabilities are more vulnerable to NCDs, because of their underlying health condition, and vulnerability to poverty and exclusion from healthcare services. NCD programmes must expand their focus beyond prevention and treatment to incorporate rehabilitation for people living with NCDs, in order to maximize their functioning and well-being. Additionally, access to healthcare needs to be improved for people with disabilities so that they can secure their right to preventive, curative and rehabilitation services. These changes may require new innovations to overcome existing gaps in healthcare capacity, such as an increasing role for mobile technology and task-sharing. This perspective paper discusses these issues, using a particular focus on stroke and dementia in order to clarify these relationships. View Full-Text
Keywords: disability; non-communicable disease; stroke; dementia; rehabilitation; healthcare access disability; non-communicable disease; stroke; dementia; rehabilitation; healthcare access
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MDPI and ACS Style

Prynn, J.E.; Kuper, H. Perspectives on Disability and Non-Communicable Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, with a Focus on Stroke and Dementia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3488. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183488

AMA Style

Prynn JE, Kuper H. Perspectives on Disability and Non-Communicable Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, with a Focus on Stroke and Dementia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(18):3488. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183488

Chicago/Turabian Style

Prynn, Josephine E.; Kuper, Hannah. 2019. "Perspectives on Disability and Non-Communicable Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, with a Focus on Stroke and Dementia" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 18: 3488. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183488

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