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Article

Healthy Choice Rewards: A Feasibility Trial of Incentives to Influence Consumer Food Choices in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

1
Apunipima Cape York Health Council, 4870 Cairns, Australia
2
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, College of Public Health Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, 4870 Cairns, Australia
3
Centre for Indigenous Health Equity Research, Central Queensland University, 4870 Cairns, Australia
4
Wardliparingga Aboriginal Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, 5001 Adelaide, Australia
5
Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Monash University, 3168 Melbourne, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010112
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 3 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addressing Food and Nutrition Security in Developed Countries)
Poor diet including inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians experience a disproportionate level of preventable chronic disease and successful strategies to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas to consume more fruit and vegetables can help address health disadvantage. Healthy Choice Rewards was a mixed methods study to investigate the feasibility of a monetary incentive: store vouchers, to promote fruit and vegetable purchasing in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Multiple challenges were identified in implementation, including limited nutrition workforce. Challenges related to the community store included frequent store closures and amended trading times, staffing issues and poor infrastructure to support fruit and vegetable promotion. No statistically significant increases in fruit or vegetable purchases were observed in the short time frame of this study. Despite this, community members reported high acceptability of the program, especially for women with children. Optimal implementation including, sufficient time and funding resources, with consideration of the most vulnerable could go some way to addressing inequities in food affordability for remote community residents. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; remote; community store; fruit and vegetables; incentive; subsidy; food security; nutrition; diet Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; remote; community store; fruit and vegetables; incentive; subsidy; food security; nutrition; diet
MDPI and ACS Style

Brown, C.; Laws, C.; Leonard, D.; Campbell, S.; Merone, L.; Hammond, M.; Thompson, K.; Canuto, K.; Brimblecombe, J. Healthy Choice Rewards: A Feasibility Trial of Incentives to Influence Consumer Food Choices in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 112. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010112

AMA Style

Brown C, Laws C, Leonard D, Campbell S, Merone L, Hammond M, Thompson K, Canuto K, Brimblecombe J. Healthy Choice Rewards: A Feasibility Trial of Incentives to Influence Consumer Food Choices in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(1):112. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010112

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brown, Clare, Cara Laws, Dympna Leonard, Sandy Campbell, Lea Merone, Melinda Hammond, Kani Thompson, Karla Canuto, and Julie Brimblecombe. 2019. "Healthy Choice Rewards: A Feasibility Trial of Incentives to Influence Consumer Food Choices in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 1: 112. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010112

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