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Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Off-Job Activities on Recovery and Sleep: A Two-Wave Panel Study among Health Care Employees

1
Human Performance Management Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2
School of Psychology, Asia Pacific Centre for Work Health and Safety, University of South Australia, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide 5001, Australia
3
Center for Human and Social Sciences College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2044; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092044
Received: 24 August 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 17 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
This study examined whether particular recovery activities after work have a positive or negative effect on employee recovery from work (i.e., cognitive, emotional, and physical detachment) and sleep quality. We used a two-wave panel study of 230 health care employees which enabled looking at both short-term and long-term effects (i.e., two-year time interval). Gender, age, marital status, children at home, education level, management position, and working hours were used as control variables. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that work-related off-job activities were negatively associated with cognitive and emotional detachment in both the short and long run, whereas low-effort off-job activities were positively related to cognitive detachment in the short run. Moreover, household/care off-job activities were positively related to sleep quality in the long run, whereas physical off-job activities were negatively associated with sleep quality in the long run. The long-term findings existed beyond the strong effects of baseline detachment and sleep quality. This study highlights the importance of off-job recovery activities for health care employees’ detachment from work and sleep quality. Practical implications and avenues for further research are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: recovery from work; off-job recovery activities; panel study; health care employees recovery from work; off-job recovery activities; panel study; health care employees
MDPI and ACS Style

De Jonge, J.; Shimazu, A.; Dollard, M. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Off-Job Activities on Recovery and Sleep: A Two-Wave Panel Study among Health Care Employees. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2044. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092044

AMA Style

De Jonge J, Shimazu A, Dollard M. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Off-Job Activities on Recovery and Sleep: A Two-Wave Panel Study among Health Care Employees. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(9):2044. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092044

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Jonge, Jan; Shimazu, Akihito; Dollard, Maureen. 2018. "Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Off-Job Activities on Recovery and Sleep: A Two-Wave Panel Study among Health Care Employees" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 9: 2044. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092044

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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