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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2044; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092044

Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Off-Job Activities on Recovery and Sleep: A Two-Wave Panel Study among Health Care Employees

1
Human Performance Management Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2
School of Psychology, Asia Pacific Centre for Work Health and Safety, University of South Australia, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide 5001, Australia
3
Center for Human and Social Sciences College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 August 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 17 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
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Abstract

This study examined whether particular recovery activities after work have a positive or negative effect on employee recovery from work (i.e., cognitive, emotional, and physical detachment) and sleep quality. We used a two-wave panel study of 230 health care employees which enabled looking at both short-term and long-term effects (i.e., two-year time interval). Gender, age, marital status, children at home, education level, management position, and working hours were used as control variables. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that work-related off-job activities were negatively associated with cognitive and emotional detachment in both the short and long run, whereas low-effort off-job activities were positively related to cognitive detachment in the short run. Moreover, household/care off-job activities were positively related to sleep quality in the long run, whereas physical off-job activities were negatively associated with sleep quality in the long run. The long-term findings existed beyond the strong effects of baseline detachment and sleep quality. This study highlights the importance of off-job recovery activities for health care employees’ detachment from work and sleep quality. Practical implications and avenues for further research are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: recovery from work; off-job recovery activities; panel study; health care employees recovery from work; off-job recovery activities; panel study; health care employees
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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de Jonge, J.; Shimazu, A.; Dollard, M. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Off-Job Activities on Recovery and Sleep: A Two-Wave Panel Study among Health Care Employees. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2044.

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