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Implementation of Motivational Interviewing Training in an Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum: Identifying Adolescents at Risk for Substance Use

1
College of Health Sciences, East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301, USA
2
School of Nursing, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725, USA
3
West Ada School District, Meridian, ID 83642, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1623; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081623
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 27 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health Needs of Vulnerable Children: Challenges and Solutions)
Motivational interviewing (MI) has been increasingly utilized by health care practitioners for many years. MI has been practiced by social workers, nurses, physicians, psychologists, substance use counselors, and many other health care practitioners. Unfortunately, many health care practitioners do not have adequate training in motivational interviewing, and therefore feel ill equipped to utilize this approach when faced with clients who are in need of assessment and coaching. This paper discusses our experiences with a pilot project to implement MI training within an Adolescent SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral to Treatment) content addition to the undergraduate nursing curriculum. It includes discussion of the evaluation, which measured student attitudes towards substance users with the Substance Use Attitudinal Survey (SAAS), student satisfaction with the newly implemented curriculum, and implications for sustainable inclusion of this content and simulation experiences at the undergraduate level to promote MI use by future health care practitioners. Pre- and post-tests (SAAS) were conducted with 51 nursing students, and 56 students completed the satisfaction survey. Overall, students were very satisfied with the implementation of the curriculum, however, we did not see significant changes in SAAS test scores. This may, however, be a positive indicator of a balanced attitude toward substance users. Continuing evaluation of the curriculum change is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: motivational interviewing; SBIRT; nursing curriculum; substance use prevention motivational interviewing; SBIRT; nursing curriculum; substance use prevention
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Seigart, D.; Veltman, M.; Willhaus, J.; Letterle, C. Implementation of Motivational Interviewing Training in an Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum: Identifying Adolescents at Risk for Substance Use. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1623.

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