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Open AccessArticle

Trend of Age-Adjusted Rates of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Emergency Departments from 2006 to 2013

by Cheng Chen 1,2, Jin Peng 1,2,3, Eric A. Sribnick 1,4,5, Motao Zhu 2,4 and Henry Xiang 1,2,3,4,*
1
Center for Pediatric Trauma Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43215, USA
2
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43215, USA
3
College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
4
Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
5
Department of Neurosurgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1171; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061171
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Objective: To use the 2006–2013 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) database to describe trends of age-adjusted rates of pediatric traumatic brain injuries (TBI) treated in U.S. emergency departments. Methods: Time trend analysis was conducted on age-adjusted rates among children ≤17 years in the U.S. The annual percent change (APC) was calculated by fitting a least squares regression to the logarithm of the rates, using the calendar year as an independent variable. Results: In males, motor-vehicle-related trauma (APC −2.5%) and severe TBI (APC −3.6%) decreased over the study time period. Conversely, concussion (APC 5.1%), unspecified head injury (APC 6.6%), fall-related TBI (APC 7.1%), and mild TBI (APC 5.9%) increased. In females, severe TBI (APC −3.3%) decreased over the study time period and concussion (APC 6.5%), unspecified head injury (APC 7.2%), fall-related TBI (APC 7.6%), and mild TBI (APC 6.8%) increased. Conclusion: The overall age-adjusted rates of pediatric TBI-related emergency department (ED) visits increased from 2006 to 2013, which is largely caused by pediatric mild TBIs, especially unspecified injury to the head (ICD-9-CM code 959.01) and concussion. In comparison, age-adjusted rates of pediatric severe TBIs decreased. A major contributing factor might be a reduced number of traffic-related head trauma. View Full-Text
Keywords: traumatic brain injury; pediatric; emergency department; annual percent change traumatic brain injury; pediatric; emergency department; annual percent change
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Chen, C.; Peng, J.; Sribnick, E.A.; Zhu, M.; Xiang, H. Trend of Age-Adjusted Rates of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Emergency Departments from 2006 to 2013. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1171.

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