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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040629

Reconsidering the Relationship between Air Pollution and Deprivation

1
School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
2
Department of Geography and Planning, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZT, UK
3
Sheffield Methods Institute, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 4DP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 February 2018 / Revised: 17 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 29 March 2018
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Abstract

This paper critically examines the relationship between air pollution and deprivation. We argue that focusing on a particular economic or social model of urban development might lead one to erroneously expect all cities to converge towards a particular universal norm. A naive market sorting model, for example, would predict that poor households will eventually be sorted into high pollution areas, leading to a positive relationship between air pollution and deprivation. If, however, one considers a wider set of theoretical perspectives, the anticipated relationship between air pollution and deprivation becomes more complex and idiosyncratic. Specifically, we argue the relationship between pollution and deprivation can only be made sense of by considering processes of risk perception, path dependency, gentrification and urbanization. Rather than expecting all areas to eventually converge to some universal norm, we should expect the differences in the relationship between air pollution and deprivation across localities to persist. Mindful of these insights, we propose an approach to modeling which does not impose a geographically fixed relationship. Results for Scotland reveal substantial variations in the observed relationships over space and time, supporting our argument. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; geographically weighted regression; spatiotemporal variations; deprivation air pollution; geographically weighted regression; spatiotemporal variations; deprivation
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Bailey, N.; Dong, G.; Minton, J.; Pryce, G. Reconsidering the Relationship between Air Pollution and Deprivation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 629.

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