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Open AccessArticle

Association between Exposure to Ambient Air Particulates and Metabolic Syndrome Components in a Saudi Arabian Population

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Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
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Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
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Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
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Department of Meteorology, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
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Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10987, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010027
Received: 3 December 2017 / Revised: 14 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 25 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulates may be a factor in the etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In this novel study, we investigated the relationship between particulate levels and prevalence of MetS component abnormalities (hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity) in a recruited cohort (N = 2025) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We observed significant associations between a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and increased risks for MetS (Risk Ratio (RR): 1.12; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06–1.19), hyperglycemia (RR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.03–1.14), and hypertension (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.14). PM2.5 from soil/road dust was found to be associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06–1.19) and hypertension (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.05–1.18), while PM2.5 from traffic was associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.05–1.71). We did not observe any health associations with source-specific mass exposures. Our findings suggest that exposure to specific elemental components of PM2.5, especially Ni, may contribute to the development of cardiometabolic disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; particulate matter; metabolic syndrome; hypertension; diabetes; hyperglycemia air pollution; particulate matter; metabolic syndrome; hypertension; diabetes; hyperglycemia
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Shamy, M.; Alghamdi, M.; Khoder, M.I.; Mohorjy, A.M.; Alkhatim, A.A.; Alkhalaf, A.K.; Brocato, J.; Chen, L.C.; Thurston, G.D.; Lim, C.C.; Costa, M. Association between Exposure to Ambient Air Particulates and Metabolic Syndrome Components in a Saudi Arabian Population. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 27.

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