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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010151

Knowledge and Attitudes of General Practitioners and Sexual Health Care Professionals Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

1
Centre for Academic Primary Care, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK
2
Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Londonderry BT52 1SA, UK
3
Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK
4
The National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK
5
The National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West (NIHR CLAHRC West), University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol BS1 2NT, UK
6
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1A2, Canada
7
Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
8
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queens University, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 November 2017 / Revised: 14 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 18 January 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [277 KB, uploaded 18 January 2018]

Abstract

Men who have sex with men (MSM) may be at higher risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. Healthcare professionals’ recommendations can affect HPV vaccination uptake. Since 2016, MSM up to 45 years have been offered HPV vaccination at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in a pilot programme, and primary care was recommended as a setting for opportunistic vaccination. Vaccination prior to potential exposure to the virus (i.e., sexual debut) is likely to be most efficacious, therefore a focus on young MSM (YMSM) is important. This study aimed to explore and compare the knowledge and attitudes of UK General Practitioners (GPs) and sexual healthcare professionals (SHCPs) regarding HPV vaccination for YMSM (age 16–24). A cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire examined 38 GPs and 49 SHCPs, including 59 (67.82%) females with a mean age of 40.71 years. Twenty-two participants (20 SHCPs, p < 0.001) had vaccinated a YMSM patient against HPV. GPs lack of time (25/38, 65.79%) and SHCP staff availability (27/49, 55.10%) were the main reported factors preventing YMSM HPV vaccination. GPs were less likely than SHCPs to believe there was sufficient evidence for vaccinating YMSM (OR = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.01, 0.47); less likely to have skills to identify YMSM who may benefit from vaccination (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.01, 0.15); and less confident recommending YMSM vaccination (OR = 0.01, 95% CI = 0.00, 0.01). GPs appear to have different knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding YMSM HPV vaccination when compared to SHCPs. View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccine uptake; vaccine communication; sexual minorities; papillomaviruses vaccine uptake; vaccine communication; sexual minorities; papillomaviruses
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Merriel, S.W.D.; Flannagan, C.; Kesten, J.M.; Shapiro, G.K.; Nadarzynski, T.; Prue, G. Knowledge and Attitudes of General Practitioners and Sexual Health Care Professionals Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Young Men Who Have Sex with Men. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 151.

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