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Urban Place and Health Equity: Critical Issues and Practices
Open AccessArticle

Slum Upgrading and Health Equity

Department of City and Regional Planning & School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14040342
Received: 14 November 2016 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 17 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Place and Health Equity)
Informal settlement upgrading is widely recognized for enhancing shelter and promoting economic development, yet its potential to improve health equity is usually overlooked. Almost one in seven people on the planet are expected to reside in urban informal settlements, or slums, by 2030. Slum upgrading is the process of delivering place-based environmental and social improvements to the urban poor, including land tenure, housing, infrastructure, employment, health services and political and social inclusion. The processes and products of slum upgrading can address multiple environmental determinants of health. This paper reviewed urban slum upgrading evaluations from cities across Asia, Africa and Latin America and found that few captured the multiple health benefits of upgrading. With the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focused on improving well-being for billions of city-dwellers, slum upgrading should be viewed as a key strategy to promote health, equitable development and reduce climate change vulnerabilities. We conclude with suggestions for how slum upgrading might more explicitly capture its health benefits, such as through the use of health impact assessment (HIA) and adopting an urban health in all policies (HiAP) framework. Urban slum upgrading must be more explicitly designed, implemented and evaluated to capture its multiple global environmental health benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: slums; health equity; slum upgrading; social determinants of health; climate change adaptation; housing; participation; sustainable development goals; health in all policies slums; health equity; slum upgrading; social determinants of health; climate change adaptation; housing; participation; sustainable development goals; health in all policies
MDPI and ACS Style

Corburn, J.; Sverdlik, A. Slum Upgrading and Health Equity. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 342. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14040342

AMA Style

Corburn J, Sverdlik A. Slum Upgrading and Health Equity. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(4):342. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14040342

Chicago/Turabian Style

Corburn, Jason; Sverdlik, Alice. 2017. "Slum Upgrading and Health Equity" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 14, no. 4: 342. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14040342

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