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Comparison of Two Sources of Clinical Audit Data to Assess the Delivery of Diabetes Care in Aboriginal Communities

1
School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
The Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia
3
Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
4
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
5
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1236; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101236
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 10 October 2017 / Accepted: 12 October 2017 / Published: 17 October 2017
The objective of this study was to determine the concordance between data extracted from two Clinical Decision Support Systems regarding diabetes testing and monitoring at Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Australia. De-identified PenCAT and Communicare Systems data were extracted from the services allocated to the intervention arm of a diabetes care trial, and intra-class correlations for each extracted item were derived at a service level. Strong to very strong correlations between the two data sources were found regarding the total number of patients with diabetes per service (Intra-class correlation [ICC] = 0.99), as well as the number (ICC = 0.98–0.99) and proportion (ICC = 0.96) of patients with diabetes by gender. The correlation was moderate for the number and proportion of Type 2 diabetes patients per service in the group aged 18–34 years (ICC = 0.65 and 0.8–0.82 respectively). Strong to very strong correlations were found for numbers and proportions of patients being tested for diabetes, and for appropriate monitoring of patients known to have diabetes (ICC = 0.998–1.00). This indicated a generally high degree of concordance between whole-service data extracted by the two Clinical Decision Support Systems. Therefore, the less expensive or less complex option (depending on the individual circumstances of the service) may be appropriate for monitoring diabetes testing and care. However, the extraction of data about subgroups of patients may not be interchangeable. View Full-Text
Keywords: decision support systems; clinical; community health services; information storage and retrieval; testing and monitoring decision support systems; clinical; community health services; information storage and retrieval; testing and monitoring
MDPI and ACS Style

Regan, T.; Paul, C.; Ishiguchi, P.; D’Este, C.; Koller, C.; Forshaw, K.; Noble, N.; Oldmeadow, C.; Bisquera, A.; Eades, S. Comparison of Two Sources of Clinical Audit Data to Assess the Delivery of Diabetes Care in Aboriginal Communities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1236. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101236

AMA Style

Regan T, Paul C, Ishiguchi P, D’Este C, Koller C, Forshaw K, Noble N, Oldmeadow C, Bisquera A, Eades S. Comparison of Two Sources of Clinical Audit Data to Assess the Delivery of Diabetes Care in Aboriginal Communities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(10):1236. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101236

Chicago/Turabian Style

Regan, Timothy, Christine Paul, Paul Ishiguchi, Catherine D’Este, Claudia Koller, Kristy Forshaw, Natasha Noble, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alessandra Bisquera, and Sandra Eades. 2017. "Comparison of Two Sources of Clinical Audit Data to Assess the Delivery of Diabetes Care in Aboriginal Communities" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14, no. 10: 1236. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101236

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