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Open AccessArticle

Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS)

1
School of Social Policy & Practice, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2
Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
3
Department of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
4
Stanford Prevention Research Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Shannon N. Zenk and Lisa M. Powell
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101133
Received: 1 July 2017 / Revised: 8 August 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 27 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environment, Diet, and Health)
Where households across income levels shop for food is of central concern within a growing body of research focused on where people live relative to where they shop, what they purchase and eat, and how those choices influence the risk of obesity and chronic disease. We analyzed data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) using a conditional logit model to determine where participants shop for food to be prepared and eaten at home and how individual and household characteristics of food shoppers interact with store characteristics and distance from home in determining store choice. Store size, whether or not it was a full-service supermarket, and the driving distance from home to the store constituted the three significant main effects on store choice. Overall, participants were more likely to choose larger stores, conventional supermarkets rather than super-centers and other types of stores, and stores closer to home. Interaction effects show that participants receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) were even more likely to choose larger stores. Hispanic participants were more likely than non-Hispanics to choose full-service supermarkets while White participants were more likely to travel further than non-Whites. This study demonstrates the value of explicitly spatial discrete choice models and provides evidence of national trends consistent with previous smaller, local studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: FoodAPS; discrete choice; food shopping; supermarkets; food retail FoodAPS; discrete choice; food shopping; supermarkets; food retail
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hillier, A.; Smith, T.E.; Whiteman, E.D.; Chrisinger, B.W. Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1133. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101133

AMA Style

Hillier A, Smith TE, Whiteman ED, Chrisinger BW. Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(10):1133. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101133

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hillier, Amy; Smith, Tony E.; Whiteman, Eliza D.; Chrisinger, Benjamin W. 2017. "Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS)" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 14, no. 10: 1133. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101133

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