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Article

Color It Real: A Program to Increase Condom Use and Reduce Substance Abuse and Perceived Stress

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Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine Prevention Research Center, 720 Westview Drive SW, Atlanta, GA 30310, USA
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Wholistic Stress Control Institute, Incorporated, 2545 Benjamin E Mays Drive, Atlanta, GA 30311, USA
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McKing Consulting Corporation, 2900 Chamblee Tucker Road, Building 10, Suite 100, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mark Edberg, Barbara E. Hayes, Valerie Montgomery Rice and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010051
Received: 15 August 2015 / Revised: 31 October 2015 / Accepted: 26 November 2015 / Published: 22 December 2015
Few interventions have targeted perceived stress as a co-occurring construct central to substance use and subsequent HIV/AIDS risk reduction among African American urban young adults. The Color It Real Program was a seven session, weekly administered age-specific and culturally-tailored intervention designed to provide substance abuse and HIV education and reduce perceived stress among African Americans ages 18 to 24 in Atlanta, GA. Effectiveness was assessed through a quasi-experimental study design that consisted of intervention (n = 122) and comparison (n = 70) groups completing a pre- and post-intervention survey. A series of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) tests were used to assess pre- to post-intervention changes between study groups. For intervention participants, perceived stress levels were significantly reduced by the end of the intervention (t(70) = 2.38, p = 0.020), condom use at last sexual encounter significantly increased (F = 4.43, p = 0.0360), intervention participants were significantly less likely to drink five or more alcoholic drinks in one sitting (F = 5.10, p = 0.0245), and to use clean needles when injecting the drug (F = 36.99, p = 0.0001). This study is among the first of its kind to incorporate stress management as an integral approach to HIV/SA prevention. The program has implications for the design of other community-based, holistic approaches to addressing substance use and risky behaviors for young adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: African Americans; young adults; substance abuse; HIV prevention; stress African Americans; young adults; substance abuse; HIV prevention; stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zellner, T.; Trotter, J.; Lenoir, S.; Walston, K.; Men-Na’a, L.; Henry-Akintobi, T.; Miller, A. Color It Real: A Program to Increase Condom Use and Reduce Substance Abuse and Perceived Stress. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010051

AMA Style

Zellner T, Trotter J, Lenoir S, Walston K, Men-Na’a L, Henry-Akintobi T, Miller A. Color It Real: A Program to Increase Condom Use and Reduce Substance Abuse and Perceived Stress. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2016; 13(1):51. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010051

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zellner, Tiffany, Jennie Trotter, Shelia Lenoir, Kelvin Walston, L’dia Men-Na’a, Tabia Henry-Akintobi, and Assia Miller. 2016. "Color It Real: A Program to Increase Condom Use and Reduce Substance Abuse and Perceived Stress" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13, no. 1: 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010051

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