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Open AccessArticle

Accumulation of Heavy Metals and Metalloid in Foodstuffs from Agricultural Soils around Tarkwa Area in Ghana, and Associated Human Health Risks

1
Laboratory of Toxicology, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo 060–0818, Japan
2
Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
3
Water Research Group, Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2531, South Africa
4
Department of Biological, Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG13, Legon, Ghana
5
Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo 060–0818, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Nil Basu, Susan Keane and Paleah Black Moher
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(8), 8811-8827; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph120808811
Received: 17 May 2015 / Revised: 15 July 2015 / Accepted: 22 July 2015 / Published: 28 July 2015
This study was carried out to assess the extent of heavy metals and metalloid accumulation from agricultural soils to foodstuffs (viz, M. esculenta (cassava) and Musa paradisiaca (plantain)) around thirteen neighboring communities within Tarkwa, Ghana; and to estimate the human health risk associated with consumption of these foodstuffs. Concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were measured with an inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometer and mercury analysis was done using a mercury analyzer. From the results, 30% of cassava samples collected, contained higher concentrations of Pb when compared to Codex Alimentarius Commission standard values. Bioconcentration factor indicated that Ni had higher capacity of absorption into food crops from soil than the other heavy metals. For both children and adults, the target hazard quotient (THQ) of Pb in cassava in communities such as Techiman, Wangarakrom, Samahu, and Tebe (only children) were greater than 1, which is defined as an acceptable risk value. This indicated that residents could be exposed to significant health risks associated with cassava consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: metals; metalloid; health risk; foodstuff; bioconcentration factor; target hazard quotient metals; metalloid; health risk; foodstuff; bioconcentration factor; target hazard quotient
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Bortey-Sam, N.; Nakayama, S.M.M.; Akoto, O.; Ikenaka, Y.; Fobil, J.N.; Baidoo, E.; Mizukawa, H.; Ishizuka, M. Accumulation of Heavy Metals and Metalloid in Foodstuffs from Agricultural Soils around Tarkwa Area in Ghana, and Associated Human Health Risks. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 8811-8827.

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