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Article

Active Transportation Safety Features around Schools in Canada

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
2
Departments of Biology and International Development Studies, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 0G4, Canada
3
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5711-5725; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10115711
Received: 15 August 2013 / Revised: 10 October 2013 / Accepted: 26 October 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
The purpose of this study was to describe the presence and quality of active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments that relate to pedestrian and bicycle safety. Variations in these features and associated traffic concerns as perceived by school administrators were examined by geographic status and school type. The study was based on schools that participated in 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey. ArcGIS software version 10 and Google Earth were used to assess the presence and quality of ten different active transportation safety features. Findings suggest that there are crosswalks and good sidewalk coverage in the environments surrounding most Canadian schools, but a dearth of bicycle lanes and other traffic calming measures (e.g., speed bumps, traffic chokers). Significant urban/rural inequities exist with a greater prevalence of sidewalk coverage, crosswalks, traffic medians, and speed bumps in urban areas. With the exception of bicycle lanes, the active transportation safety features that were present were generally rated as high quality. Traffic was more of a concern to administrators in urban areas. This study provides novel information about active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments. This information could help guide public health efforts aimed at increasing active transportation levels while simultaneously decreasing active transportation injuries. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyclist; environment; injury; pedestrian; policy; road; safety; schools; traffic cyclist; environment; injury; pedestrian; policy; road; safety; schools; traffic
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pinkerton, B.; Rosu, A.; Janssen, I.; Pickett, W. Active Transportation Safety Features around Schools in Canada. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 5711-5725. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10115711

AMA Style

Pinkerton B, Rosu A, Janssen I, Pickett W. Active Transportation Safety Features around Schools in Canada. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(11):5711-5725. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10115711

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pinkerton, Bryn; Rosu, Andrei; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William. 2013. "Active Transportation Safety Features around Schools in Canada" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 11: 5711-5725. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10115711

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