Next Article in Journal
Use or Non-Use of Gerontechnology—A Qualitative Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Does Increasing Community and Liquor Licensees’ Awareness, Police Activity, and Feedback Reduce Alcohol-Related Violent Crime? A Benefit-Cost Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Participatory Research Revealing the Work and Occupational Health Hazards of Cooperative Recyclers in Brazil
Previous Article in Special Issue
New York Tobacco Control Program Cessation Assistance: Costs, Benefits, and Effectiveness
Open AccessConcept Paper

The Effectiveness of Drinking and Driving Policies for Different Alcohol-Related Fatalities: A Quantile Regression Analysis

1
College of Management, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan
2
Institute of China and Asia-Pacific Studies, National Sun Yat-sen University, 70 Lienhai Rd., Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan
3
Department of Healthcare Information and Management, Ming Chuan University, 250 Chung-Shan N. Rd., Taipei 111, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4628-4644; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10104628
Received: 17 July 2013 / Revised: 5 September 2013 / Accepted: 13 September 2013 / Published: 27 September 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms)
To understand the impact of drinking and driving laws on drinking and driving fatality rates, this study explored the different effects these laws have on areas with varying severity rates for drinking and driving. Unlike previous studies, this study employed quantile regression analysis. Empirical results showed that policies based on local conditions must be used to effectively reduce drinking and driving fatality rates; that is, different measures should be adopted to target the specific conditions in various regions. For areas with low fatality rates (low quantiles), people’s habits and attitudes toward alcohol should be emphasized instead of transportation safety laws because “preemptive regulations” are more effective. For areas with high fatality rates (or high quantiles), “ex-post regulations” are more effective, and impact these areas approximately 0.01% to 0.05% more than they do areas with low fatality rates. View Full-Text
Keywords: quantile regression analysis; alcohol-related traffic fatalities; policies quantile regression analysis; alcohol-related traffic fatalities; policies
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ying, Y.-H.; Wu, C.-C.; Chang, K. The Effectiveness of Drinking and Driving Policies for Different Alcohol-Related Fatalities: A Quantile Regression Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 4628-4644.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Back to TopTop