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Indigenous Australians, Intellectual Disability and Incarceration: A Confluence of Rights Violations

1
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada
2
Queensland Centre for Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Mater Research Institute‚ÄĒUniversity of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
3
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 September 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 30 January 2018 / Published: 12 February 2018
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Abstract

Abstract: This article reviews the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with intellectual disability in the Australian prison system through a human rights lens. There is an information gap on this group of Australian prisoners in the health and disability literature and the multi-disciplinary criminal law and human rights law literature. This article will consider the context of Indigenous imprisonment in Australia and examine the status of prisoner health in that country, as well as the status of the health and wellbeing of prisoners with intellectual disability. It will then specifically explore the health, wellbeing and impact of imprisonment on Indigenous Australians with intellectual disability, and highlight how intersectional rights deficits (including health and human rights deficits) causally impact the ability of Indigenous Australians with intellectual disability to access due process, equal recognition and justice in the criminal justice and prison system. A central barrier to improving intersectional and discriminatory landscapes relating to health, human rights and justice for Indigenous Australian inmates with intellectual disability, and prisoners with intellectual disability more broadly in the Australian context, is the lack of sufficient governance and accountability mechanisms (including Indigenous-led mechanisms) to enforce the operationalisation of consistent, transparent, culturally responsive, rights-based remedies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; Indigenous Australians; persons with intellectual disability; prisoners with intellectual disability; human right to health; human rights Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; Indigenous Australians; persons with intellectual disability; prisoners with intellectual disability; human right to health; human rights
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Brolan, C.E.; Harley, D. Indigenous Australians, Intellectual Disability and Incarceration: A Confluence of Rights Violations. Laws 2018, 7, 7.

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