Next Issue
Previous Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Molecules, Volume 16, Issue 2 (February 2011), Pages 1011-1916

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-59
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle Dihydroberkleasmin A: A New Eremophilane Sesquiterpenoid from the Fermentation Broth of the Plant Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis photiniae
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1910-1916; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021910
Received: 11 January 2011 / Revised: 15 January 2011 / Accepted: 19 January 2011 / Published: 23 February 2011
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (231 KB)
Abstract
Dihydroberkleasmin A (1), a new ester-substituted sesquiterpenoid related to the eremophilane class, together with the known compound berkleasmin C (2), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis photiniae. The structure of dihydroberkleasmin A
[...] Read more.
Dihydroberkleasmin A (1), a new ester-substituted sesquiterpenoid related to the eremophilane class, together with the known compound berkleasmin C (2), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis photiniae. The structure of dihydroberkleasmin A (1) was elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The stereochemistry was assigned by comparison of the NMR spectroscopic data with those of berkleasmin A. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Bioactive Compounds)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Three New Steroidal Glycosides from the Roots of Cynanchum auriculatum
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1901-1909; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021901
Received: 15 November 2010 / Revised: 16 February 2011 / Accepted: 18 February 2011 / Published: 23 February 2011
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (192 KB)
Abstract
Three new steroidal glycosides, cyanoauriculosides F, G and H (1-3), were isolated from the roots of Cynanchum auriculatum (Asclepiadaceae) along with two known steroidal derivatives. On the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods, their structures were identified as
[...] Read more.
Three new steroidal glycosides, cyanoauriculosides F, G and H (1-3), were isolated from the roots of Cynanchum auriculatum (Asclepiadaceae) along with two known steroidal derivatives. On the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods, their structures were identified as 20-O-acetyl-8,14-seco-penupogenin-8-one 3-O-α-L-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-diginopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (1), 2′,3′-Z-gagaminine 3-O-α-L-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaro-pyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-diginopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (2), 17-O-acetyl-kidjoranin 3-O-α-L-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-cymaro-pyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranoside (3), gagaminine 3-O-α-L-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-digino-pyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (4) and wilfoside D1N (5). Full article
Open AccessArticle Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Succinate Prodrugs of Curcuminoids for Colon Cancer Treatment
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1888-1900; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021888
Received: 11 January 2011 / Revised: 25 January 2011 / Accepted: 17 February 2011 / Published: 22 February 2011
Cited by 52 | PDF Full-text (197 KB)
Abstract
A novel series of succinyl derivatives of three curcuminoids were synthesized as potential prodrugs. Symmetrical (curcumin and bisdesmethoxycurcumin) and unsymmetrical (desmethoxycurcumin) curcuminoids were prepared through aldol condensation of 2,4-pentanedione with different benzaldehydes. Esterification of these compounds with a methyl or ethyl ester of
[...] Read more.
A novel series of succinyl derivatives of three curcuminoids were synthesized as potential prodrugs. Symmetrical (curcumin and bisdesmethoxycurcumin) and unsymmetrical (desmethoxycurcumin) curcuminoids were prepared through aldol condensation of 2,4-pentanedione with different benzaldehydes. Esterification of these compounds with a methyl or ethyl ester of succinyl chloride gave the corresponding succinate prodrugs in excellent yields. Anticolon cancer activity of the compounds was evaluated using Caco-2 cells. The succinate prodrugs had IC50 values in the 1.8–9.6 μM range, compared to IC50 values of 3.3–4.9 μM for the parent compounds. Curcumin diethyl disuccinate exhibited the highest potency and was chosen for stability studies. Hydrolysis of this compound in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 and in human plasma followed pseudo first-order kinetics. In phosphate buffer, the kobs and t1/2 for hydrolysis indicated that the compound was much more stable than curcumin. In human plasma, this compound was able to release curcumin, therefore our results suggest that succinate prodrugs of curcuminoids are stable in phosphate buffer, release the parent curcumin derivatives readily in human plasma, and show anti-colon cancer activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prodrugs)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Tin (IV) Chloride-Promoted One-Pot Synthesis of Novel Tacrine Analogues
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1878-1887; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021878
Received: 5 January 2011 / Revised: 13 January 2011 / Accepted: 15 February 2011 / Published: 22 February 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (157 KB)
Abstract
A facile synthesis of potential acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, the tacrine analogues 3a-p, has been accomplished by direct cyclocondensation of 1-aryl-4-cyano-5-aminopyrazole with β-ketoesters using tin(IV) chloride as catalyst. The structures of all the compounds have been confirmed by IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR. Full article
Open AccessReview The Ups and Downs of Tannins as Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose)glycohydrolase
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1854-1877; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021854
Received: 24 January 2011 / Accepted: 17 February 2011 / Published: 22 February 2011
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (1312 KB)
Abstract
DNA damage to cells activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases (PARPs) and the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) synthesized is rapidly cleaved into ADP-ribose (ADPR) by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG) action. Naturally appearing tannin-like molecules have been implicated in specific inhibition of the PARG enzyme. This review deals with the
[...] Read more.
DNA damage to cells activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases (PARPs) and the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) synthesized is rapidly cleaved into ADP-ribose (ADPR) by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG) action. Naturally appearing tannin-like molecules have been implicated in specific inhibition of the PARG enzyme. This review deals with the in vitro and in vivo effects of tannins on PAR metabolism and their downstream actions in DNA damage signaling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tannins)
Open AccessArticle Enaminones as Building Blocks for the Synthesis of Substituted Pyrazoles with Antitumor and Antimicrobial Activities
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1834-1853; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021834
Received: 12 February 2011 / Accepted: 17 February 2011 / Published: 22 February 2011
Cited by 33 | PDF Full-text (396 KB)
Abstract
Novel N-arylpyrazole-containing enaminones 2a,b were synthesized as key intermediates. Reactions of 2a,b with active methylene compounds in acetic acid in the presence of ammonium acetate afforded substituted pyridine derivatives 5a-d. Enaminones 2a,b also reacted with aliphatic amines such as hydrazine hydrate
[...] Read more.
Novel N-arylpyrazole-containing enaminones 2a,b were synthesized as key intermediates. Reactions of 2a,b with active methylene compounds in acetic acid in the presence of ammonium acetate afforded substituted pyridine derivatives 5a-d. Enaminones 2a,b also reacted with aliphatic amines such as hydrazine hydrate and hydroxylamine hydrochloride to give bipyrazoles 8a,b and pyrazolylisoxazoles 9a,b, respectively. On the other hand, treatment of 2a,b with a heterocyclic amine and its diazonium salt yielded the respective [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidines 12a,b and pyrazolylcarbonyl[1,2,4]triazolo-[3,4-c][1,2,4]triazines 14a,b. Moreover, 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one (17) was prepared via reaction of enaminone 2a with aminothiouracil (15). Cyclocondensation of 17 with the appropriate hydrazonoyl chlorides 18a-c gave the corresponding pyrido[2,3-d][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidin-5-ones 21a-c. The cytotoxic effects of compounds 2b, 14a and 17 against human breast cell line (MCF-7) and liver carcinoma cell line (HEPG2) were screened and in both lines they showed inhibition effects comparable to those of 5-fluorouracil, used as a standard. The antimicrobial activity of some products chosen as representative examples was also evaluated. Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Antileishmanial Activity of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Miconia langsdorffii, Isolated Compounds, and Semi-Synthetic Derivatives
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1825-1833; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021825
Received: 8 February 2011 / Revised: 14 February 2011 / Accepted: 21 February 2011 / Published: 22 February 2011
Cited by 26 | PDF Full-text (123 KB)
Abstract
The in vitro activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extract of the aerial parts of Miconia langsdorffii Cogn. was evaluated against the promastigote forms of L. amazonensis, the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans. The bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to
[...] Read more.
The in vitro activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extract of the aerial parts of Miconia langsdorffii Cogn. was evaluated against the promastigote forms of L. amazonensis, the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans. The bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to identification of the triterpenes ursolic acid and oleanolic acid as the major compounds in the fraction that displayed the highest activity. Several ursolic acid semi-synthetic derivatives were prepared, to find out whether more active compounds could be obtained. Among these ursolic acid-derived substances, the C-28 methyl ester derivative exhibited the best antileishmanial activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products Chemistry)
Open AccessArticle New Chiral P-N Ligands for the Regio- and Stereoselective Pd-Catalyzed Dimerization of Styrene
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1804-1824; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021804
Received: 27 December 2010 / Revised: 17 February 2011 / Accepted: 18 February 2011 / Published: 22 February 2011
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (336 KB) | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Two new chiral, enantiomerically pure, hybrid P-N ligands, namely (2R,5S)-2-phenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,3-diaza-2-phosphanicyclo[3,3,0]octan-4-one (1) and (2R,5S)-2-phenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,3-diaza-2-phosphanicyclo[3,3,0]octane (2), have been synthesized starting from L-proline. The two ligands differ in the presence or not of a
[...] Read more.
Two new chiral, enantiomerically pure, hybrid P-N ligands, namely (2R,5S)-2-phenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,3-diaza-2-phosphanicyclo[3,3,0]octan-4-one (1) and (2R,5S)-2-phenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,3-diaza-2-phosphanicyclo[3,3,0]octane (2), have been synthesized starting from L-proline. The two ligands differ in the presence or not of a carbonyl group in the diazaphosphane ring. Their coordination chemistry towards Pd(II) was studied by reacting them with [Pd(CH3)Cl(cod)]. A different behaviour was observed: ligand 2 shows the expected bidentate chelating behaviour leading to the mononuclear Pd-complex, while ligand 1 acts as a terdentate ligand giving a dinuclear species. The corresponding cationic derivatives were obtained from the palladium neutral complexes, both as mono- and dinuclear derivatives, and tested as precatalysts for styrene dimerization, yielding E-1,3-diphenyl-1-butene regio- and stereoselectively as the sole product. A detailed analysis of the catalytic behaviour is reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Homogeneous Catalysis)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Diversity of Phage-Displayed Libraries of Peptides during Panning and Amplification
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1776-1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021776
Received: 27 December 2010 / Revised: 10 February 2011 / Accepted: 17 February 2011 / Published: 21 February 2011
Cited by 91 | PDF Full-text (1815 KB)
Abstract
The amplification of phage-displayed libraries is an essential step in the selection of ligands from these libraries. The amplification of libraries, however, decreases their diversity and limits the number of binding clones that a screen can identify. While this decrease might not be
[...] Read more.
The amplification of phage-displayed libraries is an essential step in the selection of ligands from these libraries. The amplification of libraries, however, decreases their diversity and limits the number of binding clones that a screen can identify. While this decrease might not be a problem for screens against targets with a single binding site (e.g., proteins), it can severely hinder the identification of useful ligands for targets with multiple binding sites (e.g., cells). This review aims to characterize the loss in the diversity of libraries during amplification. Analysis of the peptide sequences obtained in several hundred screens of peptide libraries shows explicitly that there is a significant decrease in library diversity that occurs during the amplification of phage in bacteria. This loss during amplification is not unique to specific libraries: it is observed in many of the phage display systems we have surveyed. The loss in library diversity originates from competition among phage clones in a common pool of bacteria. Based on growth data from the literature and models of phage growth, we show that this competition originates from growth rate differences of only a few percent for different phage clones. We summarize the findings using a simple two-dimensional “phage phase diagram”, which describes how the collapse of libraries, due to panning and amplification, leads to the identification of only a subset of the available ligands. This review also highlights techniques that allow elimination of amplification-induced losses of diversity, and how these techniques can be used to improve phage-display selection and enable the identification of novel ligands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phage Display of Combinatorial Libraries)
Open AccessArticle Effects of Bentonite on p-Methoxybenzyl Acetate: A Theoretical Model for Oligomerization via an Electrophilic-Substitution Mechanism
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1761-1775; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021761
Received: 29 November 2010 / Revised: 14 February 2011 / Accepted: 15 February 2011 / Published: 21 February 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2741 KB)
Abstract
Tonsil Actisil FF, a commercial bentonitic clay, promotes the formation of a series of electrophilic-aromatic-substitution products from para-methoxybenzyl acetate in carbon disulfide. The molecules obtained correspond to linear isomeric dimers, trimers, tetramers and a pentamer, according to their spectroscopic data. A clear
[...] Read more.
Tonsil Actisil FF, a commercial bentonitic clay, promotes the formation of a series of electrophilic-aromatic-substitution products from para-methoxybenzyl acetate in carbon disulfide. The molecules obtained correspond to linear isomeric dimers, trimers, tetramers and a pentamer, according to their spectroscopic data. A clear indication of the title mechanistic pathway for the oligomerization growth was obtained from the analysis of a set of computational-chemistry calculations using the density-functional-theory level B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p). The corresponding conclusions were based on the computed dipole moments, the HOMO/LUMO distributions, and a natural-populations analysis of the studied molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Organic Chemistry)
Open AccessArticle Structure of Dihydrochalcones and Related Derivatives and Their Scavenging and Antioxidant Activity against Oxygen and Nitrogen Radical Species
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1749-1760; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021749
Received: 21 November 2010 / Revised: 21 December 2010 / Accepted: 5 January 2011 / Published: 21 February 2011
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (326 KB)
Abstract
Quantum mechanical calculations at B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory were employed to obtain energy (E), ionization potential (IP), bond dissociation enthalpy (O-H BDE) and stabilization energies (DEiso) in order to infer the scavenging activity of dihydrochalcones (DHC) and structurally related compounds. Spin
[...] Read more.
Quantum mechanical calculations at B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory were employed to obtain energy (E), ionization potential (IP), bond dissociation enthalpy (O-H BDE) and stabilization energies (DEiso) in order to infer the scavenging activity of dihydrochalcones (DHC) and structurally related compounds. Spin density calculations were also performed for the proposed antioxidant activity mechanism of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (2,4,6-THA). The unpaired electron formed by the hydrogen abstraction from the phenolic hydroxyl group of 2,4,6-THA is localized on the phenolic oxygen at 2, 6, and 4 positions, the C3 and C6 carbon atoms at ortho positions, and the C5 carbon atom at para position. The lowest phenolic oxygen contribution corresponded to the highest scavenging activity value. It was found that antioxidant activity depends on the presence of a hydroxyl at the C2 and C4 positions and that there is a correlation between IP and O-H BDE and peroxynitrite scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation. These results identified the pharmacophore group for DHC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants)
Open AccessArticle Identification of Calpain Substrates by ORF Phage Display
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1739-1748; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021739
Received: 3 January 2011 / Accepted: 18 February 2011 / Published: 21 February 2011
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (223 KB)
Abstract
Substrate identification is the key to defining molecular pathways or cellular processes regulated by proteases. Although phage display with random peptide libraries has been used to analyze substrate specificity of proteases, it is difficult to deduce endogenous substrates from mapped peptide motifs. Phage
[...] Read more.
Substrate identification is the key to defining molecular pathways or cellular processes regulated by proteases. Although phage display with random peptide libraries has been used to analyze substrate specificity of proteases, it is difficult to deduce endogenous substrates from mapped peptide motifs. Phage display with conventional cDNA libraries identifies high percentage of non-open reading frame (non-ORF) clones, which encode short unnatural peptides, owing to uncontrollable reading frames of cellular proteins. We recently developed ORF phage display to identify endogenous proteins with specific binding or functional activity with minimal reading frame problem. Here we used calpain 2 as a protease to demonstrate that ORF phage display is capable of identifying endogenous substrates and showed its advantage to re-verify and characterize the identified substrates without requiring pure substrate proteins. An ORF phage display cDNA library with C-terminal biotin was bound to immobilized streptavidin and released by cleavage with calpain 2. After three rounds of phage selection, eleven substrates were identified, including calpastatin of endogenous calpain inhibitor. These results suggest that ORF phage display is a valuable technology to identify endogenous substrates for proteases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phage Display of Combinatorial Libraries)
Open AccessReview Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1710-1738; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021710
Received: 14 January 2011 / Revised: 29 January 2011 / Accepted: 31 January 2011 / Published: 18 February 2011
Cited by 113 | PDF Full-text (329 KB)
Abstract
Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant
[...] Read more.
Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages. Full article
Open AccessArticle Eucalyptus oleosa Essential Oils: Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of the Oils from Different Plant Parts (Stems, Leaves, Flowers and Fruits)
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1695-1709; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021695
Received: 19 January 2011 / Revised: 24 January 2011 / Accepted: 17 February 2011 / Published: 17 February 2011
Cited by 65 | PDF Full-text (147 KB)
Abstract
Essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the different parts (stems, adult leaves, immature flowers and fruits) of Eucalyptus oleosa were screened for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their chemical composition. According to GC-FID and GC-MS, the principal compound of the stem, immature
[...] Read more.
Essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the different parts (stems, adult leaves, immature flowers and fruits) of Eucalyptus oleosa were screened for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their chemical composition. According to GC-FID and GC-MS, the principal compound of the stem, immature flowers and the fruit oils was 1,8-cineole, representing 31.5%, 47.0% and 29.1%, respectively. Spathulenol (16.1%) and γ-eudesmol (15.0%) were the two principal compounds of adult leaves oil. In the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) assay, the oils of the four parts showed moderate antioxidant activity. In the ABTS (2,2’-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) assay, the most active part was the adult leaves, with a IC50 value 13.0 ± 0.6 mg/L, followed by stems (IC50 = 43.5 ± 1.4 mg/L). The essential oils showed a better antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and a significant antifungal activity also was observed against yeast-like fungi. A strong correlations between oxygenated monoterpenes and antimicrobial activity (especially 1,8-cineole) were noted (R2 = 0.99, 0.97 and 0.79 for B. subtilis, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans, respectively). Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Bioactive Compounds)
Open AccessArticle Bis-Indole Derivatives for Polysaccharide Compositional Analysis and Chiral Resolution of D-, L-Monosaccharides by Ligand Exchange Capillary Electrophoresis Using Borate-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Selector
Molecules 2011, 16(2), 1682-1694; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules16021682
Received: 22 December 2010 / Accepted: 16 February 2011 / Published: 17 February 2011
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (278 KB)
Abstract
A series of aldo-bis-indole derivatives (aldo-BINs) was prepared by aromatic C-alkylation reactions of aldoses and indole in acetic acid solution. Common monosaccharides such as glucose, mannose, galactose, fucose, xylose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose and N-acetylglucosamine were smoothly derivatized to form the UV
[...] Read more.
A series of aldo-bis-indole derivatives (aldo-BINs) was prepared by aromatic C-alkylation reactions of aldoses and indole in acetic acid solution. Common monosaccharides such as glucose, mannose, galactose, fucose, xylose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose and N-acetylglucosamine were smoothly derivatized to form the UV absorbing aldo-BINs. The use of a capillary electrophoretic method to separate these novel aldo-BIN derivatives was established. The capillary electrophoresis conditions were set by using borate buffer (100 mM) at high pH (pH 9.0). The limit of determination was assessed to be 25 nM. The enantioseparation of D, L-pairs of aldo-BINs based on chiral ligand-exchange capillary electrophoresis technology was also achieved by using modified hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin as the chiral selector in the presence of borate buffer. This aldose labeling method was applied successfully to the compositional and configurational analysis of saccharides, exemplified by a rapid and efficient method to simultaneously analyze the composition and configuration of saccharides from the medicinal herbs Cordyceps sinensis and Dendrobium huoshanense. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glycosides)
Back to Top