Special Issue "Epidemiology of West Nile Virus"

Quicklinks

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Roy A. Hall
Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia. Qld. 4072, Australia
E-Mail: roy.hall@uq.edu.au
Interests: studies on vector-borne viruses and the diseases they cause; animal models of virulence and pathogenesis; diagnostic and vaccine development; ecology and epidemiology

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alexander Khromykh
Prof. Dr. Alexander Khromykh Australian Infectious Disease Research Centre, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Website: http://www.scmb.uq.edu.au/staff/alexander-khromykh
E-Mail: a.khromykh@uq.edu.au
Interests: molecular biology and pathogenesis of flaviviruses and alphaviruses; viral vectors for vaccines and cancer therapy

Guest Editor
Dr. Jody Hobson-Peters
Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
E-Mail: j.peters2@uq.edu.au

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne viral pathogen of global importance. Over the last two decades it has been responsible for significant disease outbreaks in man and animals in many parts of the world due to the emergence of new strains and their incursion into new geographic regions.  This has resulted in tens of thousands of cases of fever and neurological disease and thousands of fatalities. Recent reports of the evolution of new virulent strains of WNV affecting horses in Australia in 2011 and a resurgence in the number of human cases in the US in 2012 are timely reminders that WNV remains a serious emerging global pathogen of medical and veterinary significance.  This special issue invites the contribution of original research articles or reviews that advance our knowledge on West Nile virus and the disease its causes. This includes, but is not limited to, topics such as the evolution of new strains of West Nile virus and their geographical distribution, reports of recent outbreaks of WNV diseases in humans and animals, the vector transmission of WNV to susceptible vertebrates and the disease it produces in these hosts. The development or application of new technologies for the control and surveillance of WNV such as detection and diagnostic assays, vaccines and treatment options are also important topics welcomed in this issue.

Prof. Dr. Roy A. Hall
Prof. Dr. Alexander Khromykh
Dr. Jody Hobson-Peters
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • West Nile virus
  • epidemiology
  • ecology
  • vertebrate hosts
  • mosquito vectors
  • pathogenesis
  • virus surveillance
  • diagnostics
  • prevention

Published Papers (23 papers)

by , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(2), 1211-1232; doi:10.3390/ijerph110201211
Received: 1 August 2013; in revised form: 5 November 2013 / Accepted: 8 November 2013 / Published: 23 January 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (2874 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 67-90; doi:10.3390/ijerph110100067
Received: 23 September 2013; in revised form: 3 December 2013 / Accepted: 4 December 2013 / Published: 20 December 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (368 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 7180-7192; doi:10.3390/ijerph10127180
Received: 8 October 2013; in revised form: 27 November 2013 / Accepted: 2 December 2013 / Published: 13 December 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (296 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 7144-7164; doi:10.3390/ijerph10127144
Received: 25 September 2013; in revised form: 25 November 2013 / Accepted: 26 November 2013 / Published: 12 December 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (2518 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6534-6610; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126534
Received: 30 July 2013; in revised form: 11 November 2013 / Accepted: 12 November 2013 / Published: 2 December 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1169 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6366-6379; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126366
Received: 22 September 2013; in revised form: 7 November 2013 / Accepted: 11 November 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (961 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6255-6272; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126255
Received: 24 September 2013; in revised form: 4 November 2013 / Accepted: 7 November 2013 / Published: 25 November 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (485 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 6049-6083; doi:10.3390/ijerph10116049
Received: 19 August 2013; in revised form: 24 October 2013 / Accepted: 29 October 2013 / Published: 12 November 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1478 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5584-5602; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115584
Received: 6 August 2013; in revised form: 8 October 2013 / Accepted: 15 October 2013 / Published: 29 October 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (1306 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5399-5432; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115399
Received: 15 August 2013; in revised form: 23 September 2013 / Accepted: 24 September 2013 / Published: 25 October 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (481 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
abstract graphic

by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 5111-5129; doi:10.3390/ijerph10105111
Received: 5 September 2013; in revised form: 5 October 2013 / Accepted: 8 October 2013 / Published: 16 October 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (511 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4869-4895; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104869
Received: 15 August 2013; in revised form: 20 September 2013 / Accepted: 24 September 2013 / Published: 11 October 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (745 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4718-4727; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104718
Received: 5 July 2013; in revised form: 12 September 2013 / Accepted: 17 September 2013 / Published: 1 October 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (392 KB) | HTML Full-text

by , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4669-4689; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104669
Received: 1 August 2013; in revised form: 17 September 2013 / Accepted: 22 September 2013 / Published: 30 September 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(9), 4486-4506; doi:10.3390/ijerph10094486
Received: 9 July 2013; in revised form: 12 September 2013 / Accepted: 16 September 2013 / Published: 23 September 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (724 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files

by , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(9), 4432-4443; doi:10.3390/ijerph10094432
Received: 5 August 2013; in revised form: 9 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 17 September 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(9), 4200-4223; doi:10.3390/ijerph10094200
Received: 8 July 2013; in revised form: 2 September 2013 / Accepted: 5 September 2013 / Published: 10 September 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (275 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3735-3752; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083735
Received: 17 July 2013; in revised form: 7 August 2013 / Accepted: 7 August 2013 / Published: 19 August 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (260 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3543-3562; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083543
Received: 1 June 2013; in revised form: 25 July 2013 / Accepted: 1 August 2013 / Published: 9 August 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (641 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
abstract graphic

by , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3192-3202; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083192
Received: 28 May 2013; in revised form: 23 July 2013 / Accepted: 25 July 2013 / Published: 31 July 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (300 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3112-3120; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083112
Received: 14 June 2013; in revised form: 12 July 2013 / Accepted: 15 July 2013 / Published: 24 July 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (246 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 3052-3071; doi:10.3390/ijerph10073052
Received: 7 April 2013; in revised form: 25 April 2013 / Accepted: 14 May 2013 / Published: 22 July 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (777 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 3033-3051; doi:10.3390/ijerph10073033
Received: 7 June 2013; in revised form: 15 July 2013 / Accepted: 16 July 2013 / Published: 22 July 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Environmental Drivers of West Nile Fever Epidemiology
Authors: Shlomit Paz1 and Jan C. Semenza2
Affiliations: 1 Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel; E-Mail: shlomit@geo.haifa.ac.il
2 European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden
Abstract: The epidemiology of West Nile fever is multifactorial and complex.  Environmental drivers such as climatic variables play a role in vector competence and disease transmission.  Ambient temperature is an important determinant of mosquito abundance, biting rate, as well as viral replication rates within the mosquito.  However, the contribution of precipitation is more complex and less well understood.  In this paper we discuss direct and indirect impacts of climatic parameters (temperature, relative humidity, precipitation) and other environmental drivers (vegetation, bird migration) on WNV transmission. In light of the recent climatic changes, these impacts should be taken into account when evaluating the risk of the disease spreading in the coming years.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Exploring New Strains of West Nile Virus and their Geographical Distribution: A Review oF recent Literature
Authors: Esra Ozdenerol1 and Gregory N. Taff2
Affiliations: 1Spatial Analysis and Geographic Education Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA; E-Mail: eozdenrl@memphis.edu
2 Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Tromso, Norway
Abstract: Over the last two decades WNV has been responsible for significant disease outbreaks in man and animals in many parts of the world. Its extremely rapid global diffusion argues for a better understanding of its geographic dimensions.  The aim of this inquiry was to explore new strains and their incursion into new geographic regions. Review of the recent literature on spatial WNV disease risk modeling led to the conclusion that numerous environmental factors might be critical for its dissemination. New GIS-based studies are monitoring occurrence at the macro-level, and helping pinpoint areas of occurrence at the micro-level, where geographically-targeted, species-specific control measures are sometimes taken and more sophisticated methods of surveillance have been used.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Using Undergraduate Researchers to Build Vector Surveillance Capacity for West Nile Virus
Author: Gregory Johnson
Affiliation: Department of A&RS, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA; E-Mail: gdj@montana.edu
Abstract: Vector surveillance for infectious disease is labor intensive and constantly threatened by budget decisions. We report on outcomes of an undergraduate research experience designed to build surveillance capacity for West Nile Virus (WNV) in Montana. Students maintained weekly trapping stations for mosquitoes and implemented assays to test for WNV in pools of Culex tarsalis. Test results were verified in a partnership with the state health lab and disseminated to the ArboNET Surveillance System. Combined with prior surveillance data, Cx. tarsalis accounted for 12% of mosquitoes with an average capture rate of 74 Cx. tarsalis females per trap night and an average infection rate of 0.3 infected mosquitoes per 1000 individuals. However, capture and infection rates varied greatly across years and locations. Infection rate, but not capture rate, was significantly associated with the number of WNV human cases reported to ArboNET.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Effect of Urban Wetlands on WNV Transmission
Author: Dina Fonseca
Affiliation: Center for Vector Biology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA; E-Mail: dinafons@rci.rutgers.edu
Abstract: The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of habitat fragmentation and degree of isolation of urban wetland patches on the prevalence of West Nile virus (WNV) within the northeastern United States. To accomplish this, we analyzed the effects of wetland fragmentation and isolation on mosquito species richness, the community presence of WNV-competent enzootic and bridge vector species, and the prevalence of WNV over two transmission seasons (2011-2012) within the suburban corridor of central New Jersey (USA). The results reveal new insights into the true impacts of urban wetlands on the transmission dynamics of WNV within highly populated (2,600-7,600 inhabitants per square mile) urban areas.

Last update: 23 May 2013

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert