E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maria Daglia

Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food chemistry and analysis; food supplements; functional foods; chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods; natural compounds; polyphenols; antioxidant activity; anti-inflammatory activity; epigenetic effect of food components –mirnas; preclinical studies
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Simone Carradori

Department of Pharmacy, University “G. d'Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: medicinal chemistry; innovative (micro)extraction procedures; microwave-assisted extraction; synthetic and natural-derived biologically active molecules; monoamine oxidase inhibitors; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; anticancer agents; anti-Helicobacter pylori agents; antifungal agents; anti-leishmanial and anti-Malaria compounds
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Annabella Vitalone

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology “V. Erspamer”, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: safety assessment of herbal products; phytovigilance; medicinal plants used for weight control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, we accepted an invitation to serve as Guest Editors for this Special Issue, "Discovery of Natural Active Agents against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites” of the journal Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049 http://www.mdpi.com/journal/molecules). In this regard, we would be pleased if you would agree to contribute an original research paper, a short communication, or a focus review to this issue. Provided below is some information that you may find useful in your consideration of this invitation.

This Special Issue aims to collect and disseminate some of the most significant and recent contributions in the interdisciplinary area of pharmacology, pharmacognosy, and food/medicinal chemistry, with a particular emphasis on the (biotechnological) production, isolation and characterization, biological effects, uses, and analysis of semi-synthetic and natural products. The main applications of these natural active compounds must be strictly focused on microbial (bacterial, fungal and viral) infections, parasite eradication, food contamination and preservation, inhibition of biofilm production and resistance development, herbal formulations, new mechanism of action, structure-activity elucidation, and chemically modified natural compounds with improved biological activity. The biological activity of natural extracts without a proper chemical characteriztion will not be considered.

Prof. Dr. Maria Daglia
Prof. Dr. Simone Carradori
Prof. Dr. Annabella Vitalone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial agents
  • food contamination
  • innovative (micro)extraction procedures
  • synthetic derivatives inspired by natural scaffolds
  • food and food supplements analyses
  • pharmaco-toxicological activities
  • physiological activities of food and food components
  • uses of medicinal plants and fungi
  • biofilm and resistance

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Antimycobacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis(H37Ra) Model
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2381; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092381
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 13 September 2018 / Accepted: 16 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
PDF Full-text (359 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the antimycobacterial activity and the possible action mode of cinnamon bark essential oil and its main constituent—cinnamaldehyde—against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC 25177 strain. Cinnamaldehyde was proved to be the main bioactive compound responsible for mycobacterial
[...] Read more.
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the antimycobacterial activity and the possible action mode of cinnamon bark essential oil and its main constituent—cinnamaldehyde—against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC 25177 strain. Cinnamaldehyde was proved to be the main bioactive compound responsible for mycobacterial growth inhibition and bactericidal effects. The antimycobacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde was found to be comparable with that of ethambutol, one of the first-line anti-TB antibiotics. The selectivity index determined using cell culture studies in vitro showed a high biological potential of cinnamaldehyde. In M. tuberculosis cells exposed to cinnamaldehyde the cell membrane stress sensing and envelope preserving system are activated. Overexpression of clgR gene indicates a threat to the stability of the cell membrane and suggests a possible mechanism of action. No synergism was detected with the basic set of antibiotics used in tuberculosis treatment: ethambutol, isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampicin, and ciprofloxacin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Chemometric Comparison and Classification of Some Essential Oils Extracted from Plants Belonging to Apiaceae and Lamiaceae Families Based on Their Chemical Composition and Biological Activities
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2261; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092261
Received: 25 July 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 25 August 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
PDF Full-text (695 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study is focused on the comparison and classification of parsley, lovage, basil, and thyme essential oils (EOs) based on their chemical composition, total phenolic content, antioxidant and antibacterial activities by using appropriate chemometric methods: Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis
[...] Read more.
This study is focused on the comparison and classification of parsley, lovage, basil, and thyme essential oils (EOs) based on their chemical composition, total phenolic content, antioxidant and antibacterial activities by using appropriate chemometric methods: Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The results showed that parsley, lovage, and thyme EOs are rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons, but basil EO is rich in oxygenated monoterpenes and phenylpropanoids, and that both PCA and HCA separated essential oils into two main groups of which one contains two sub-groups. β-Phellandrene was the major component identified in parsley and lovage EOs, estragole was the major component in basil EO, and p-cymene was the major component in thyme EO. Thyme EO showed the highest level of total phenolics, the highest antioxidant capacity, and exhibited the stronger antibacterial activity, results that were emphasized by both chemometric methods used. Among tested essential oils, the one of parsley was distinguished by a low total TPC, weak antioxidant activity, and weak antibacterial activity against S. enteritidis (ATCC 13076); lovage EO by low TPC, weak antioxidant activity, but moderate antibacterial activity; and basil EO by low TPC, moderate antioxidant activity, and weak antibacterial activity against L. monocytogenes (ATCC 19114). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Antioxidant and Antimutagenic Activities of Different Fractions from the Leaves of Rhododendron arboreum Sm. and Their GC-MS Profiling
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2239; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092239
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 16 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
PDF Full-text (1270 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this era of urbanization and environmental pollution, antioxidants and antimutagens derived from plants are promising safeguards for human health. In the current investigation, we analyzed the antioxidant and antimutagenic effects of the hexane, chloroform, and ethyl acetate fractions of Rhododendron arboreum Sm.
[...] Read more.
In this era of urbanization and environmental pollution, antioxidants and antimutagens derived from plants are promising safeguards for human health. In the current investigation, we analyzed the antioxidant and antimutagenic effects of the hexane, chloroform, and ethyl acetate fractions of Rhododendron arboreum Sm. leaves and determined their chemical composition. The different fractions inhibited lipid peroxidation, repressed the production of nitric oxide radicals, and prevented deoxyribose degradation. The antimutagenic activity of the leaf fractions was analyzed against 4-nitro-O-phenylenediamine, sodium azide and 2-aminofluorene mutagens in two test strains (TA-98 and TA-100) of Salmonella typhimurium. The experiment was conducted using pre- and co-incubation modes. The best results were obtained in the pre-incubation mode, and against indirect acting mutagen. The presence of a number of bioactive constituents was confirmed in the different fractions by GC-MS analysis. The study reveals the strong antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of R. arboreum leaves. We propose that those activities of R. arboreum might correspond to the combined effect of the phytochemicals identified by GC-MS analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the antimutagenic activity of R. arboreum leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The α-Cyclodextrin/Moringin Complex: A New Promising Antimicrobial Agent against Staphylococcus aureus
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2097; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092097
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 18 August 2018 / Accepted: 18 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
PDF Full-text (2370 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the major clinical concerns, making the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs desirable. Moringin (MOR), the major isothiocyanate produced from Moringa oleifera seeds, could represent an alternative therapeutic strategy to commonly used antibiotics. The aim of our study was
[...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the major clinical concerns, making the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs desirable. Moringin (MOR), the major isothiocyanate produced from Moringa oleifera seeds, could represent an alternative therapeutic strategy to commonly used antibiotics. The aim of our study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of MOR conjugated with α-cyclodextrin (MOR/α-CD), a complex with an improved solubility and stability in aqueous solutions. Our data demonstrated that MOR/α-CD was able to exert antimicrobial activity against the S. aureus reference strains (ATCC 25923, ATCC 6538, and ATCC BAA-977). Moreover, MOR/α-CD showed bacteriostatic effects (MIC = minimum inhibitory concentration = 0.5 mg/mL) and bactericidal properties (MBC = minimum bactericidal concentration = 1 mg/mL) against the overall assessed strains. In addition, MOR/α-CD showed bactericidal activity against the S. aureus strain ATCC BAA-977 after treatment with erythromycin (Ery), which induced clindamycin-resistance on the erm (A) gene. This evidence led us to assume that MOR/α-CD could be a promising antimicrobial agent against strains with the clindamycin-resistant phenotype (CC-resistant). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle A Polyphenol Rich Extract from Solanum melongena L. DR2 Peel Exhibits Antioxidant Properties and Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Activity In Vitro
Molecules 2018, 23(8), 2066; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23082066
Received: 2 August 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 14 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
PDF Full-text (1477 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
DR2B and DR2C extracts, obtained by ethanolic maceration of peel from commercially and physiologically ripe aubergine berries, were studied for the antioxidative cytoprotective properties and anti-HSV-1 activity, in line with the evidence that several antioxidants can impair viral replication by maintaining reducing conditions
[...] Read more.
DR2B and DR2C extracts, obtained by ethanolic maceration of peel from commercially and physiologically ripe aubergine berries, were studied for the antioxidative cytoprotective properties and anti-HSV-1 activity, in line with the evidence that several antioxidants can impair viral replication by maintaining reducing conditions in host cells. The antioxidative cytoprotective effects against tBOOH-induced damage were assessed in Caco2 cells, while antiviral activity was studied in Vero cells; polyphenolic fingerprints were characterized by integrated phytochemical methods. Results highlighted different compositions of the extracts, with chlorogenic acid and delphinidin-3-rutinoside as the major constituents; other peculiar phytochemicals were also identified. Both samples reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and exhibited scavenging and chelating properties. DR2C partly counteracted the tBOOH-induced cytotoxicity, with a remarkable lowering of lactate metabolism under both normoxia and hypoxia; interestingly, it increased intracellular GSH levels. Furthermore, DR2C inhibited the HSV-1 replication when added for 24 h after viral adsorption, as also confirmed by the reduction of many viral proteins’ expression. Since DR2C was able to reduce NOX4 expression during HSV-1 infection, its antiviral activity may be correlated to its antioxidant properties. Although further studies are needed to better characterize DR2C activity, the results suggest this extract as a promising new anti-HSV-1 agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Biopesticide Activity from Drimanic Compounds to Control Tomato Pathogens
Molecules 2018, 23(8), 2053; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23082053
Received: 24 July 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 14 August 2018 / Published: 16 August 2018
PDF Full-text (402 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tomato crops can be affected by several infectious diseases produced by bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Four phytopathogens are of special concern because of the major economic losses they generate worldwide in tomato production; Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato,
[...] Read more.
Tomato crops can be affected by several infectious diseases produced by bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Four phytopathogens are of special concern because of the major economic losses they generate worldwide in tomato production; Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, causative agents behind two highly destructive diseases, bacterial canker and bacterial speck, respectively; fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici that causes Fusarium Wilt, which strongly affects tomato crops; and finally, Phytophthora spp., which affect both potato and tomato crops. Polygodial (1), drimenol (2), isonordrimenone (3), and nordrimenone (4) were studied against these four phytopathogenic microorganisms. Among them, compound 1, obtained from Drimys winteri Forst, and synthetic compound 4 are shown here to have potent activity. Most promisingly, the results showed that compounds 1 and 4 affect Clavibacter michiganensis growth at minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) values of 16 and 32 µg/mL, respectively, and high antimycotic activity against Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora spp. with MIC of 64 µg/mL. The results of the present study suggest novel treatment alternatives with drimane compounds against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Active Agents Against Bacteria, Fungi and Parasites)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Bacterial bioactive inhibit Nitzschia ovalis settlement during early biofilm formation, altering its bacterial community
Authors: Claudia D. Infante1, Francisca Castillo 2 , Gonzalo Icaza 3,4, Francisca Marchant 4, Fernando Silva-Aciares 2,6, Carlos E. Riquelme 2,6
Affiliation: 1. Laboratorio de Biotecnología, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Chile
2. Laboratorio de Ecología Microbiana, Centro de Bioinnovación de Antofagasta (CBIA). Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Recursos Biológicos, Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta, Chile
3. Laboratorio de Complejidad Microbiana y Ecología Funcional. Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Recursos Biológicos, Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta, Chile
4. Centro de Biotecnología y Bioingeniería, Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta, Chile
5. Departamento de Biotecnología. Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta, Chile
Corresponding Author: Claudia D. Infante; El Llano Subercaseaux 2801, San Miguel, ZIP code: 8910060, Santiago, Chile; claudia.infante@uautonoma.cl
Abstract: The symbiotic interaction between marine bacteria and microalgae suggests the existence of a relevant function that controls phytoplanktonic dynamics in the marine environment, which would depend on the bacterial microbiota associated with the microalgae. The marine bacteria Alteromonas sp. Ni1-LEM has inhibitory activity on the adhesion of some diatoms, due to a soluble bioactive compound secreted in the medium. After 48 h of Nitzschia ovalis co-culture with the bacterial compound modified the epiphytic bacterial community, preventing the settlement and formation of primary fouling. A change in the diversity and temporal variability of the microbiota associated with the microalga, was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing targeting the V3–V4 regions using Illumina-MiSeq technology. Bacteroidetes were dominant at the start of culturing, and Proteobacteria increased after 48 h in both fractions (i.e. free-living and adhered bacterial communities). Bacterial abundance and species composition were directly linked to the physiological status of the algae, suggesting distinctive roles during biofilm formation.
Keywords Biofouling, Phytoplankton, Free-living bacteria, Adhered bacteria, Microalga, 16S.

Back to Top