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Special Issue "Selected Papers from 2015 International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jianbo Xiao

Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau; College of Food Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
E-Mail
Interests: phytochemicals; polyphenols; diabetes; function food; natural products; glycosylation; biological activity; flavonoids; stilbenoids; pharmacokinetics; nutrition and metabolism; polyphenol-protein interaction
Guest Editor
Dr. Maria Daglia

Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0039 0382987388
Fax: +39 0382 987 186

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise manuscripts of papers presented at the 2015 Phytochemical Society of Europe meeting in collaboration with the Phytochemical Society of - International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015, http://cmsmag.shnu.edu.cn/Default.aspx?tabid=14688&language=en-US).

This Special Issue seeks an updated and new base of knowledge on the phytochemicals in medicines and food. Evidence from epidemiological investigation shows that natural phytochemicals have received increased attention due to their considerable benefits in preventing and managing of modern diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. This Special Issue will shape the future research direction for this important nutrients source. Our purpose is to feature high-quality, advanced research and knowledge, contributed by various research groups all around the world working on phytochemicals. We invite researchers to contribute reviews and reports of their recent work on the chemistry, biology, nutrition, and biotechnology of phytochemicals. Please note, registration is obligatory for acceptance.

It will focus on phytochemicals in medicine and food, including following aspects:

1. Natural products for the prevention and therapy of modern diseases.

2. Nutrients from plants for the therapy and chemoprevention of modern diseases.

3. Importance of the natural phytochemicals in medicine and food

4. QSAR and modeling for natural drugs design.

5. Natural antioxidants and human health.

6. New strategy of using natural products for managing diseases.

7. Pharmacokinetics and biotransformation of phytochemicals

8. Food-medicine/phytochemicals interaction

9. Nutrition and metabolism of phytochemicals

Dr. Jianbo Xiao
Dr. Maria Daglia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural phytochemicals
  • medicinal plants
  • natural products
  • food chemistry
  • phytochemistry
  • nutrition
  • metabolism
  • prevention
  • chemoprevention
  • function food
  • pharmacokinetics
  • biotransformation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Effects of Fuzhuan Brick-Tea Water Extract on Mice Infected with E. coli O157:H7
Nutrients 2015, 7(7), 5309-5326; doi:10.3390/nu7075218
Received: 5 February 2015 / Revised: 17 April 2015 / Accepted: 25 May 2015 / Published: 1 July 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (777 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fuzhuan brick-tea extract (FBTE) affects the physiology of mice infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7. For 10 consecutive days, 0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 g/mL FBTE was administered intragastrically to three groups of infected Kunming mice, and changes in immunological function, hematology, and histopathology were
[...] Read more.
Fuzhuan brick-tea extract (FBTE) affects the physiology of mice infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7. For 10 consecutive days, 0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 g/mL FBTE was administered intragastrically to three groups of infected Kunming mice, and changes in immunological function, hematology, and histopathology were examined. The results revealed upregulation of platelets, total protein, and albumin along with downregulation of serum triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, and urea nitrogen in FBTE-treated mice. Histological sections of stomach, kidney, duodenum, ileum, and colon suggested that infected mucous membranes could be rehabilitated by low- and high-dose FBTE and that inflammation was alleviated. Similarly, increased thymic function in mice treated with middle- and high-dose FBTE led to elevated serum hemolysin antibody titer and increased CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as indicated by CD4+ and CD8+ expression on intestinal mucosa. Monocyte and macrophage function was improved by three FBTE dosages tested. Colonic microbiota analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed characteristic bands in infected mice treated with middle- and high-dose FBTE and increased species diversity in Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Clostridium cluster IV. These results suggest that FBTE may protect kidney and liver of mice infected with E. coli O157:H7, improve immune function, and regulate the colonic microbiota. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Effect of Stay-Green Wheat, a Novel Variety of Wheat in China, on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in High-Fat Diet Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats
Nutrients 2015, 7(7), 5143-5155; doi:10.3390/nu7075143
Received: 20 February 2015 / Revised: 3 June 2015 / Accepted: 11 June 2015 / Published: 26 June 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (2106 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of natural hypoglycemic compounds is important in preventing and managing Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150–180 g were divided into four groups to investigate the effects of the compounds in stay-green wheat (SGW), a novel variety
[...] Read more.
The use of natural hypoglycemic compounds is important in preventing and managing Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150–180 g were divided into four groups to investigate the effects of the compounds in stay-green wheat (SGW), a novel variety of wheat in China, on T2DM rats. The control group (NDC) was fed with a standard diet, while T2DM was induced in the rats belonging to the other three groups by a high-fat diet followed by a streptozotocin (STZ) injection. The T2DM rats were further divided into a T2DM control group (DC), which was fed with the normal diet containing 50% common wheat flour, a high dose SGW group (HGW) fed with a diet containing 50% SGW flour, and a low dose SGW group (LGW) fed with a diet containing 25% SGW flour and 25% common wheat flour. Our results showed that SGW contained cereal antioxidants, particularly high in flavonoids and anthocyanins (46.14 ± 1.80 mg GAE/100 g DW and 1.73 ± 0.14 mg CGE/100 g DW, respectively). Furthermore, SGW exhibited a strong antioxidant activity in vitro (30.33 ± 2.66 μg TE/g DW, p < 0.01). Administration of the SGW at a high and low dose showed significant down-regulatory effects on fasting blood glucose (decreasing by 11.3% and 7.0%, respectively), insulin levels (decreasing by 12.3% and 9.7%, respectively), and lipid status (decreasing by 9.1% and 7.5%, respectively) in T2DM rats (p < 0.01). In addition, the T2DM groups treated with SGW at a high and low dose showed a significant increase in the blood superoxide dismutase (1.17 fold and 1.15 fold, respectively) and glutathione peroxidase activities (1.37 fold and 1.30 fold, respectively) compared with the DC group (p < 0.01). The normalized impaired antioxidant status of the pancreatic islet and of the liver compared with the DC group was also significantly increased. Our results indicated that SGW components exerting a glycemic control and a serum lipid regulation effect may be due to their free radical scavenging capacities to reduce the risk of T2DM in experimental diabetic rats. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview The Reciprocal Interactions between Polyphenols and Gut Microbiota and Effects on Bioaccessibility
Nutrients 2016, 8(2), 78; doi:10.3390/nu8020078
Received: 8 October 2015 / Accepted: 11 January 2016 / Published: 6 February 2016
Cited by 42 | PDF Full-text (1293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As of late, polyphenols have increasingly interested the scientific community due to their proposed health benefits. Much of this attention has focused on their bioavailability. Polyphenol–gut microbiota interactions should be considered to understand their biological functions. The dichotomy between the biotransformation of polyphenols
[...] Read more.
As of late, polyphenols have increasingly interested the scientific community due to their proposed health benefits. Much of this attention has focused on their bioavailability. Polyphenol–gut microbiota interactions should be considered to understand their biological functions. The dichotomy between the biotransformation of polyphenols into their metabolites by gut microbiota and the modulation of gut microbiota composition by polyphenols contributes to positive health outcomes. Although there are many studies on the in vivo bioavailability of polyphenols, the mutual relationship between polyphenols and gut microbiota is not fully understood. This review focuses on the biotransformation of polyphenols by gut microbiota, modulation of gut microbiota by polyphenols, and the effects of these two-way mutual interactions on polyphenol bioavailability, and ultimately, human health. Full article
Open AccessReview Cell Systems to Investigate the Impact of Polyphenols on Cardiovascular Health
Nutrients 2015, 7(11), 9229-9255; doi:10.3390/nu7115462
Received: 21 September 2015 / Revised: 21 October 2015 / Accepted: 28 October 2015 / Published: 11 November 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (741 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polyphenols are a diverse group of micronutrients from plant origin that may serve as antioxidants and that contribute to human health in general. More specifically, many research groups have investigated their protective effect against cardiovascular diseases in several animal studies and human trials.
[...] Read more.
Polyphenols are a diverse group of micronutrients from plant origin that may serve as antioxidants and that contribute to human health in general. More specifically, many research groups have investigated their protective effect against cardiovascular diseases in several animal studies and human trials. Yet, because of the excessive processing of the polyphenol structure by human cells and the residing intestinal microbial community, which results in a large variability between the test subjects, the exact mechanisms of their protective effects are still under investigation. To this end, simplified cell culture systems have been used to decrease the inter-individual variability in mechanistic studies. In this review, we will discuss the different cell culture models that have been used so far for polyphenol research in the context of cardiovascular diseases. We will also review the current trends in cell culture research, including co-culture methodologies. Finally, we will discuss the potential of these advanced models to screen for cardiovascular effects of the large pool of bioactive polyphenols present in foods and their metabolites. Full article
Open AccessReview Polyphenolic Composition of Crataegus monogyna Jacq.: From Chemistry to Medical Applications
Nutrients 2015, 7(9), 7708-7728; doi:10.3390/nu7095361
Received: 21 June 2015 / Revised: 5 August 2015 / Accepted: 27 August 2015 / Published: 11 September 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (714 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The abundance of scientific evidence has shown that many synthetic drugs can cause serious adverse effects in patients. Recently, the search of natural therapeutic agents with low adverse effects has attracted much attention. In particular, considerable interest has focused on edible and medicinal
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The abundance of scientific evidence has shown that many synthetic drugs can cause serious adverse effects in patients. Recently, the search of natural therapeutic agents with low adverse effects has attracted much attention. In particular, considerable interest has focused on edible and medicinal plants, which play an important role in human diet, and have been used for disease treatment since ancient times. Crataegus monogyna Jacq. (hawthorn) is one of the most important edible plants of the Rosaceae family and is also used in traditional medicine. Growing evidence has shown that this plant has various interesting physiological and pharmacological activities due to the presence of different bioactive natural compounds. In addition, scientific evidence suggests that the toxicity of hawthorn is negligible. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to provide a critical review of the available scientific literature about pharmacological activities as well as botanical aspects, phytochemistry and clinical impacts of C. monogyna. Full article
Open AccessReview Antibacterial Effects of Cinnamon: From Farm to Food, Cosmetic and Pharmaceutical Industries
Nutrients 2015, 7(9), 7729-7748; doi:10.3390/nu7095359
Received: 20 July 2015 / Revised: 26 August 2015 / Accepted: 1 September 2015 / Published: 11 September 2015
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (190 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times, because of their antimicrobial properties increasing the safety and shelf life of food products by acting against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria. Plants have historically been used in traditional medicine as sources of natural
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Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times, because of their antimicrobial properties increasing the safety and shelf life of food products by acting against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria. Plants have historically been used in traditional medicine as sources of natural antimicrobial substances for the treatment of infectious disease. Therefore, much attention has been paid to medicinal plants as a source of alternative antimicrobial strategies. Moreover, due to the growing demand for preservative-free cosmetics, herbal extracts with antimicrobial activity have recently been used in the cosmetic industry to reduce the risk of allergies connected to the presence of methylparabens. Some species belonging to the genus Cinnamomum, commonly used as spices, contain many antibacterial compounds. This paper reviews the literature published over the last five years regarding the antibacterial effects of cinnamon. In addition, a brief summary of the history, traditional uses, phytochemical constituents, and clinical impact of cinnamon is provided. Full article
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