Special Issue "Chitins and Chitosans"

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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rong-Nan Huang
Insect Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Entomology, National Taiwan University, No. 27, Lane 113, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan
Website: http://www.entomol.ntu.edu.tw/english/html/huangrn.htm
E-Mail: Rongent@ntu.edu.tw
Interests: tissue engineering; bioinescticide

Special Issue Information

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (16 papers)

Molecules 2014, 19(4), 4433-4451; doi:10.3390/molecules19044433
Received: 3 March 2014; in revised form: 24 March 2014 / Accepted: 4 April 2014 / Published: 10 April 2014
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Molecules 2013, 18(7), 8563-8578; doi:10.3390/molecules18078563
Received: 23 May 2013; in revised form: 11 July 2013 / Accepted: 15 July 2013 / Published: 19 July 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(7), 7848-7864; doi:10.3390/molecules18077848
Received: 25 April 2013; in revised form: 17 June 2013 / Accepted: 26 June 2013 / Published: 3 July 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(6), 6952-6968; doi:10.3390/molecules18066952
Received: 26 April 2013; in revised form: 27 May 2013 / Accepted: 7 June 2013 / Published: 13 June 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(6), 6734-6747; doi:10.3390/molecules18066734
Received: 3 April 2013; in revised form: 29 May 2013 / Accepted: 31 May 2013 / Published: 7 June 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(6), 6550-6572; doi:10.3390/molecules18066550
Received: 23 April 2013; in revised form: 27 May 2013 / Accepted: 29 May 2013 / Published: 4 June 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(6), 6532-6549; doi:10.3390/molecules18066532
Received: 19 March 2013; in revised form: 29 May 2013 / Accepted: 31 May 2013 / Published: 3 June 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(6), 6521-6531; doi:10.3390/molecules18066521
Received: 17 April 2013; in revised form: 25 May 2013 / Accepted: 29 May 2013 / Published: 3 June 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(6), 6193-6214; doi:10.3390/molecules18066193
Received: 6 April 2013; in revised form: 15 May 2013 / Accepted: 20 May 2013 / Published: 24 May 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(5), 5749-5760; doi:10.3390/molecules18055749
Received: 1 April 2013; in revised form: 29 April 2013 / Accepted: 9 May 2013 / Published: 16 May 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(5), 5611-5647; doi:10.3390/molecules18055611
Received: 1 April 2013; in revised form: 2 May 2013 / Accepted: 6 May 2013 / Published: 15 May 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(5), 5455-5471; doi:10.3390/molecules18055455
Received: 1 April 2013; in revised form: 2 May 2013 / Accepted: 6 May 2013 / Published: 10 May 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(4), 4437-4450; doi:10.3390/molecules18044437
Received: 19 February 2013; in revised form: 20 March 2013 / Accepted: 9 April 2013 / Published: 15 April 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(3), 3118-3136; doi:10.3390/molecules18033118
Received: 20 December 2012; in revised form: 24 January 2013 / Accepted: 25 February 2013 / Published: 8 March 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(1), 1015-1035; doi:10.3390/molecules18011015
Received: 16 November 2012; in revised form: 30 December 2012 / Accepted: 7 January 2013 / Published: 15 January 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(1), 27-40; doi:10.3390/molecules18010027
Received: 8 November 2012; in revised form: 26 November 2012 / Accepted: 10 December 2012 / Published: 20 December 2012
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of the Paper: Review
Title: Chitin, Chitosan, and Cytokine Signaling in Inflammation
Author: Matt J. Kipper
Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
Abstract: All materials that contact human tissues and fluids induce some response from the cells and signaling molecules that constitute the innate immune system. Inflammation is an essential set of processes of the innate immune system that govern the immediate response to biomaterials. The progression of the inflammation processes are important for wound healing, fighting infections, and modulating adaptive immune responses. Hence, understanding the interactions of a biomaterial with the cells and signals involved in inflammation is critical for the biomaterials scientist. Chitin and chitosan have been proposed for many many biomedical applications, including tissue engineering scaffolds, wound healing dressings, mucosal drug delivery vehicles, vaccine adjuvants, and gene transfection agents. These applications have been the subject of extensive review. For all of these applications the inflammation response could be critical to the safety and efficacy of a device or therapeutic. Hence, this unique review summarizes the current understanding of how chitin and chitosan influence the important inflammation signaling mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels, and offers perspective on the applications listed above.

Type of the Paper: Review
Title: Chitosan for Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering Applications
Authors: R.M. Raftery 1, F.J. O’Brien 1,2 and S.A. Cryan 3
Affiliations: 1Tissue Engineering Research Group, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 2Trinity Centre of Bioengineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 3School of Pharmacy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland
Abstract: Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. There are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non viral gene delivery approaches. Chitosan has generated significant interest as a gene delivery vector (GDV) and offers a natural polymer alternative. Much of the appeal of chitosan as a GDV relates to its biodegradable and biocompatible nature and. the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), HeLa cells, COS-1 cells, human lung carcinoma cells (A549), B16 melanoma cells and human osteosarcoma cells (MG63). The application of gene therapy to the field of tissue engineering is extremely promising, for example in orthopaedic tissue engineering the controlled expression of therapeutic proteins such as BMP-2 or VEGF can stimulate bone repair. Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of biomaterial properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; as well as its biodegradable and biocompatible nature, it has anti-bacterial activity and its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with GAGs and other proteoglycans. It can be engineered to produce a range of delivery and tissue engineering constructs including nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

Last update: 4 February 2013

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