Special Issue "Viruses and Bats"

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A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Patrick C.Y. Woo
Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, University Pathology Building, Queen Mary Hospital Compound, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
Website: http://www.microbiology.hku.hk/staff/staff_hp/Dr_Patrick_Woo.html
E-Mail: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hk
Phone: +852 2255 4715
Fax: +852 2855 1241

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditionally, bats are known to be reservoirs of important viruses associated with fatal infections in human, such as rabies virus, Ebola virus, Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Among reported viruses associated with bats, most are RNA viruses. Certain families of bats including the Pteropodidae, Molossidae, Phyllostomidae, and Vespertilionidae are most frequently associated with known human pathogens. The natural reservoir for SARS coronavirus, which has caused more than 700 deaths globally, was eventually found to be horseshoe bats. In the recent ten years, the use of conventional PCR/RT-PCR as well as metagenomics and next generation sequencing technologies have led to the discovery of an unprecedented number of novel viruses in bats, including some virus families (e.g. picornaviruses) that have never been reported in bats. Recently, bats were also found to be the reservoir of a novel subtype of influenza virus. The present Special issue covers a wide range of topics related to “bats and viruses”.

Prof. Dr. Patrick C.Y. Woo
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (7 papers)

by , , , , , , , , ,  and
Viruses 2014, 6(5), 2138-2154; doi:10.3390/v6052138
Received: 19 February 2014; in revised form: 27 April 2014 / Accepted: 6 May 2014 / Published: 16 May 2014
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by , , ,  and
Viruses 2014, 6(5), 2084-2121; doi:10.3390/v6052084
Received: 7 February 2014; in revised form: 10 April 2014 / Accepted: 6 May 2014 / Published: 16 May 2014
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by ,  and
Viruses 2014, 6(5), 1911-1928; doi:10.3390/v6051911
Received: 3 February 2014; in revised form: 4 April 2014 / Accepted: 9 April 2014 / Published: 29 April 2014
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by , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Viruses 2014, 6(5), 1897-1910; doi:10.3390/v6051897
Received: 24 February 2014; in revised form: 4 April 2014 / Accepted: 8 April 2014 / Published: 29 April 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1619 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by  and
Viruses 2014, 6(4), 1759-1788; doi:10.3390/v6041759
Received: 1 February 2014; in revised form: 1 April 2014 / Accepted: 2 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
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by  and
Viruses 2014, 6(4), 1564-1577; doi:10.3390/v6041564
Received: 28 January 2014; in revised form: 13 March 2014 / Accepted: 17 March 2014 / Published: 3 April 2014
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by , , , ,  and
Viruses 2013, 5(11), 2679-2689; doi:10.3390/v5112679
Received: 27 September 2013; in revised form: 25 October 2013 / Accepted: 28 October 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


Type of Paper:
Review
Title: Lyssavirus Infections of Bats: Emergence and Zoonotic Threat
Author: Ashley C. Banyard
Affiliation: Wildlife Zoonoses and Vector Borne Disease Research Group, Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Weybridge, New Haw, Surrey KT15 3NB, UK
Abstract: The continued detection of zoonotic viral infections in bats has led to the microbial fauna of these mammals being studied at a greater level than ever before. Whilst numerous pathogens have been discovered in bat species, infection with lyssaviruses is of particular significance from a zoonotic perspective as, where human infection has been reported, infection is invariably fatal. Here we review the detection of lyssaviruses within different bat species and overview what is understood regarding their maintenance and transmission following both experimental and natural infection. We discuss the relevance of these pathogens as zoonotic agents and the threat of newly discovered viruses to human populations.

Type of Paper:
Review
Title: Getting Prepared Against Future Zoonotic Transmission: Three-dimensional Structures of Bat-coronavirus Main Proteases and their Use in Designing Antivirals
Authors: Qingjun Ma, Yibei Xiao, Linlin Zhang, Daizong Lin and Rolf Hilgenfeld
Affiliation: Institute of Biochemistry, university of Lübeck. Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538Lübeck, Germany. Email: hilgenfeld@biochem.uni-luebeck.de
Abstract: At least four of the six known human coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV and the newly emerging MERS-CoV, very likely originated from bat reservoirs. We have therefore initiated a research project in which we determine the three-dimensional structures of the main protease (also called 3C-like protease) of various bat coronaviruses. During the SARS outbreak of 2003, we have established the main protease of human coronaviruses as a suitable antiviral drug target. In preparation against future zoonotic transmission of one or the other bat coronavirus, we design inhibitors of the respective main proteases on the basis of our structural findings and synthesize them. One compound that we created this way has already shown good activity against MERS-CoV in virus-infected cell culture. Potentially, this approach can save years of preclinical research in case of an human epidemic caused by the zoonotic transmission of bat coronaviruses. This article will report the current state of the project.

Last update: 2 June 2014

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