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Special Issue "Foodomics 2011"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francesco Capozzi

BioNMR Laboratory, Dept. Of Agro-Food Science and Technology, University of Bologna,Piazza Goidanich, 60, I-47521 Cesena (FC), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +39 0547 382348
Interests: Foodomics; NMR spectroscopy; metabonomics; food molecular profiles; food digestion; multivariate analysis of spectroscopic data

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Changes in the Amino Acid Composition of Bogue (Boops boops) Fish during Storage at Different Temperatures by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy
Nutrients 2012, 4(6), 542-553; doi:10.3390/nu4060542
Received: 30 April 2012 / Revised: 4 June 2012 / Accepted: 11 June 2012 / Published: 20 June 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (372 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to obtain information about the changes occurring in Bogue (Boops boops) fish during storage. For this purpose, 1H-NMR spectra were recorded at 600 MHz on trichloroacetic acid extracts of fish flesh stored over a
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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to obtain information about the changes occurring in Bogue (Boops boops) fish during storage. For this purpose, 1H-NMR spectra were recorded at 600 MHz on trichloroacetic acid extracts of fish flesh stored over a 15 days period both at 4 °C and on ice. Such spectra allowed the identification and quantification of amino acids, together with the main organic acids and alcohols. The concentration of acidic and basic free amino acids was generally found to increase and decrease during storage, respectively. These concentration changes were slow during the first days, as a consequence of protein autolysis, and at higher rates afterward, resulting from microbial development. Two of the amino acids that showed the greatest concentration change were alanine and glycine, known to have a key role in determining the individual taste of different fish species. The concentration of serine decreased during storage, as highlighted in the literature for frozen fish samples. Differences in the amino acids concentration trends were found to be related to the different storage temperatures from day 4 onwards. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
Open AccessArticle Everyday Eating Experiences of Chocolate and Non-Chocolate Snacks Impact Postprandial Anxiety, Energy and Emotional States
Nutrients 2012, 4(6), 554-567; doi:10.3390/nu4060554
Received: 16 March 2012 / Revised: 11 May 2012 / Accepted: 11 June 2012 / Published: 20 June 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (349 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Social and psychological stressors are both a part of daily life and are increasingly recognized as contributors to individual susceptibility to develop diseases and metabolic disorders. The present study investigated how snacks differing in sensory properties and presentation can influence ratings of affect
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Social and psychological stressors are both a part of daily life and are increasingly recognized as contributors to individual susceptibility to develop diseases and metabolic disorders. The present study investigated how snacks differing in sensory properties and presentation can influence ratings of affect in consumers with different levels of dispositional anxiety. This study examines the relationships between a pre-disposition to anxiety and food using a repeated exposures design with three interspersed test days over a period of two weeks. The study was conducted on ninety free-living male (n = 28) and female (n = 62) Dutch participants aged between 18 and 35 years old, with a BMI between 18 and 25 kg/m2 and different anxiety trait levels assessed using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory tests. The study was randomized by age, gender, anxiety trait score, and followed a parallel open design. Three test products: dark chocolate, a milk chocolate snack and crackers with cheese spread (control), which differed in composition, sensory properties and presentation, were evaluated. Changes in self-reported anxiety, emotion, and energetic states were assessed as a function of eating the snacks just after consumption and up to one hour. The repeated exposure design over a period of two weeks enabled the investigations of potential cumulative effects of regular consumption of the food products. The milk chocolate snack resulted in the decrease of anxiety in high anxiety trait subjects, whereas dark chocolate and cheese and crackers respectively improved the anxiety level and the energetic state of low anxiety trait participants. The mood effects were not altered with repeated exposure, and the magnitude of changes was similar on each test day, which illustrates the repeatability of the effects of the food on subjective measures of postprandial wellness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
Open AccessArticle 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Olive Oils Commercially Available as Italian Products in the United States of America
Nutrients 2012, 4(5), 343-355; doi:10.3390/nu4050343
Received: 19 January 2012 / Revised: 25 April 2012 / Accepted: 26 April 2012 / Published: 4 May 2012
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (348 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Multivariate analysis of 1H NMR data has been used for the characterization of 12 blended olive oils commercially available in the U.S. as Italian products. Chemometric methods such as unsupervised Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed good discrimination and gave some affinity indications
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Multivariate analysis of 1H NMR data has been used for the characterization of 12 blended olive oils commercially available in the U.S. as Italian products. Chemometric methods such as unsupervised Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed good discrimination and gave some affinity indications for the U.S. market olive oils compared to other single cultivars of extra virgin olive oil such as Coratina and Ogliarola from Apulia, one of Italy’s leading olive oil producers, Picual (Spain), Kalamata (Greece) and Sfax (Tunisia). The olive oils commercially available as Italian products in the U.S. market clustered into 3 groups. Among them only the first (7 samples) and the second group (2 samples) showed PCA ranges similar to European references. Two oils of the third group (3 samples) were more similar to Tunisian references. In conclusion, our study revealed that most EVOO (extra virgin olive oils) tested were closer to Greek (in particular) and Spanish olive oils than Apulia EVOO. The PCA loadings disclose the components responsible for the discrimination as unsaturated (oleic, linoleic, linolenic) and saturated fatty acids. All are of great importance because of their nutritional value and differential effects on the oxidative stability of oils. It is evident that this approach has the potential to reveal the origin of EVOO, although the results support the need for a larger database, including EVOO from other Italian regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
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Open AccessArticle Current Challenges in Detecting Food Allergens by Shotgun and Targeted Proteomic Approaches: A Case Study on Traces of Peanut Allergens in Baked Cookies
Nutrients 2012, 4(2), 132-150; doi:10.3390/nu4020132
Received: 25 December 2011 / Revised: 8 February 2012 / Accepted: 13 February 2012 / Published: 21 February 2012
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (705 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in
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There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in the detection of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 from a representative processed food matrix. Shotgun proteomics was employed for selection of the proteotypic peptides for targeted approaches via selective reaction monitoring. Peanut presence through detection of the proteotypic Ara h 3/4 peptides AHVQVVDSNGNR (m/z 432.5, 3+) and SPDIYNPQAGSLK (m/z 695.4, 2+) was confirmed and the developed method was able to detect peanut presence at trace levels (≥10 μg peanut g−1 matrix) in baked cookies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
Open AccessArticle Assessment of the Effect of High or Low Protein Diet on the Human Urine Metabolome as Measured by NMR
Nutrients 2012, 4(2), 112-131; doi:10.3390/nu4020112
Received: 30 January 2012 / Revised: 11 February 2012 / Accepted: 13 February 2012 / Published: 20 February 2012
Cited by 33 | PDF Full-text (4836 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to identify urinary metabolite profiles that discriminate between high and low intake of dietary protein during a dietary intervention. Seventy-seven overweight, non-diabetic subjects followed an 8-week low-calorie diet (LCD) and were then randomly assigned to a high
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The objective of this study was to identify urinary metabolite profiles that discriminate between high and low intake of dietary protein during a dietary intervention. Seventy-seven overweight, non-diabetic subjects followed an 8-week low-calorie diet (LCD) and were then randomly assigned to a high (HP) or low (LP) protein diet for 6 months. Twenty-four hours urine samples were collected at baseline (prior to the 8-week LCD) and after dietary intervention; at months 1, 3 and 6, respectively. Metabolite profiling was performed by 1H NMR and chemometrics. Using partial least squares regression (PLS), it was possible to develop excellent prediction models for urinary nitrogen (root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) = 1.63 mmol/L; r = 0.89) and urinary creatinine (RMSECV = 0.66 mmol/L; r = 0.98). The obtained high correlations firmly establish the validity of the metabolomic approach since urinary nitrogen is a well established biomarker for daily protein consumption. The models showed that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is correlated to urinary nitrogen. Furthermore, urinary creatine was found to be increased by the HP diet whereas citric acid was increased by the LP diet. Despite large variations in individual dietary intake, differentiated metabolite profiles were observed at the dietary group-level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
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Open AccessArticle Antiapoptotic and Antiautophagic Effects of Eicosapentaenoic Acid in Cardiac Myoblasts Exposed to Palmitic Acid
Nutrients 2012, 4(2), 78-90; doi:10.3390/nu4020078
Received: 3 November 2011 / Revised: 30 January 2012 / Accepted: 30 January 2012 / Published: 7 February 2012
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1006 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Apoptosis is a programmed cell death that plays a critical role in cell homeostasis. In particular, apoptosis in cardiomyocytes is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including heart failure. Recently autophagy has emerged as an important modulator of programmed cell death pathway. Recent evidence
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Apoptosis is a programmed cell death that plays a critical role in cell homeostasis. In particular, apoptosis in cardiomyocytes is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including heart failure. Recently autophagy has emerged as an important modulator of programmed cell death pathway. Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acids induce cell death through apoptosis and this effect is specific for palmitate. On the other hand, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been implicated in the protection against cardiovascular diseases, cardiac ischemic damage and myocardial dysfunction. In the present study we show that n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) treatment to culture medium of H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts protects cells against palmitate-induced apoptosis, as well as counteracts palmitate-mediated increase of autophagy. Further investigation is required to establish whether the antiautophagic effect of EPA may be involved in its cytoprotective outcome and to explore the underlying biochemical mechanisms through which palmitate and EPA control the fate of cardiac cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)

Review

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Open AccessReview Protein Analysis-on-Chip Systems in Foodomics
Nutrients 2012, 4(10), 1475-1489; doi:10.3390/nu4101475
Received: 22 May 2012 / Revised: 21 July 2012 / Accepted: 30 September 2012 / Published: 16 October 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (341 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Protein compositional data can address nutritional, packaging, origin/authenticity, processing history, safety and other quality questions. Such data has been time-consuming and expensive to generate until recently but “protein analysis on a chip” systems are now available that can analyze a complex food sample
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Protein compositional data can address nutritional, packaging, origin/authenticity, processing history, safety and other quality questions. Such data has been time-consuming and expensive to generate until recently but “protein analysis on a chip” systems are now available that can analyze a complex food sample in a few minutes and do not require great protein analytical expertise. We review some of the main new approaches with examples of their application and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
Open AccessReview Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach
Nutrients 2012, 4(4), 243-257; doi:10.3390/nu4040243
Received: 23 November 2011 / Revised: 2 March 2012 / Accepted: 16 March 2012 / Published: 27 March 2012
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (487 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Celiac disease (CD), a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin), is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of
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Celiac disease (CD), a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin), is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
Open AccessReview Muscle Growth and Poultry Meat Quality Issues
Nutrients 2012, 4(1), 1-12; doi:10.3390/nu4010001
Received: 27 October 2011 / Revised: 21 November 2011 / Accepted: 1 December 2011 / Published: 22 December 2011
Cited by 39 | PDF Full-text (944 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward
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Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward further processed products has emphasized the necessity for higher standards in poultry meat to improve sensory characteristics and functional properties. It is believed that genetic progress has put more stress on the growing bird and it has resulted in histological and biochemical modifications of the muscle tissue by impairing some meat quality traits. The most current poultry meat quality concerns are associated with deep pectoral muscle disease and white striping which impair product appearance, and increased occurrence of problems related with the meat’s poor ability to hold water during processing and storage (PSE-like condition) as well as poor toughness and cohesiveness related to immaturity of intramuscular connective tissue. This paper is aimed at making a general statement of recent studies focusing on the relationship between muscle growth and meat quality issues in poultry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2011)
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