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Special Issue "Advances in Anthocyanin Research 2018"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. M. Monica Giusti

Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: functional foods, phytonutrients, natural colorants; chemistry and functionality of flavonoids, with emphasis on anthocyanins as food colorants and functional foods and other phenolic compounds, such as isoflavones and proanthocyanidins
Guest Editor
Dr. Gregory T. Sigurdson

Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: naturally derived pigments; anthocyanins and polyphenolics; chemistry affecting color expression; color quality, analytical methods; application in foods and other matrices as colorants or bioactives; health promoting properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interest and research on anthocyanin-based pigments has been increasing considerably in recent years. PubMed shows an almost exponential growth curve in the number of anthocyanins publications, having increased from 55 (in 1996) to 264 (in 2006) and to 892 (in 2016). Anthocyanins have long been identified as important pigments responsible for many flower, fruit, and vegetable colorations, producing a complex variety of hues ranging from yellow–red–purple–blue. More recently, colorants are being studied, not only for their biochemical roles in plants, but also for their applications in human products and contributions to health. Works on anthocyanins, specifically, as well as epidemiological findings, further indicate these plant produced pigments to be beneficial in the reduction of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Considerable advances in the identification, analysis, application, and biological activities of anthocyanins have been made in recent years. However, the pigments exhibit diverse natural chemistry. Currently, more than 700 unique anthocyanin structures have been identified in nature, and many more in processed foods, each generally having distinctive reactivity and colorimetric properties. Therefore, authors are invited to submit manuscripts to this Molecules Special Issue, “Advances in Anthocyanin Research 2018”, in which all aspects related to anthocyanin chemistry, such as composition, degradative reactions, biosynthesis; applications in agricultural, cosmetic, and food chemistry; use as natural colorants; and aspects or mechanisms of nutrition or reducing the risks of chronic diseases will be discussed.

Prof. Dr. M. Monica Giusti
Dr. Gregory T. Sigurdson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anthocyanin pigments
  • Natural colorants
  • Botanical aspects
  • Color quality of foods, drugs, and cosmetics
  • Anthocyanin chemistry and application
  • Anthocyanin absorption and metabolism
  • Anthocyanin Bioactivity and functionality
  • Anthocyanin’s role in the reduction of chronic diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Exogenous 24-Epibrassinolide Interacts with Light to Regulate Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis in Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.)
Molecules 2018, 23(1), 93; doi:10.3390/molecules23010093
Received: 2 November 2017 / Revised: 28 December 2017 / Accepted: 29 December 2017 / Published: 9 January 2018
PDF Full-text (10374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) are crucial factors that affect the quality of grapes and the making of wine, which were stimulated by various stimuli and environment factors (sugar, hormones, light, and temperature). The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of
[...] Read more.
Anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) are crucial factors that affect the quality of grapes and the making of wine, which were stimulated by various stimuli and environment factors (sugar, hormones, light, and temperature). The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of exogenous 24-Epibrassinolide (EBR) and light on the mechanism of anthocyanins and PAs accumulation in grape berries. Grape clusters were sprayed with EBR (0.4 mg/L) under light and darkness conditions (EBR + L, EBR + D), or sprayed with deionized water under light and darkness conditions as controls (L, D), at the onset of veraison. A large amount of anthocyanins accumulated in the grape skins and was measured under EBR + L and L treatments, whereas EBR + D and D treatments severely suppressed anthocyanin accumulation. This indicated that EBR treatment could produce overlay effects under light, in comparison to that in dark. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that EBR application up-regulated the expression of genes (VvCHI1, VvCHS2, VvCHS3, VvDFR, VvLDOX, VvMYBA1) under light conditions. Under darkness conditions, only early biosynthetic genes of anthocyanin biosynthesis responded to EBR. Furthermore, we also analyzed the expression levels of the BR-regulated transcription factor VvBZR1 (Brassinazole-resistant 1) and light-regulated transcription factor VvHY5 (Elongated hypocotyl 5). Our results suggested that EBR and light had synergistic effects on the expression of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Anthocyanin Research 2018)
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Open AccessArticle Phytoestrogenic Activity of Blackcurrant Anthocyanins Is Partially Mediated through Estrogen Receptor Beta
Molecules 2018, 23(1), 74; doi:10.3390/molecules23010074
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
PDF Full-text (2243 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Phytoestrogens are plant compounds with estrogenic effects found in many foods. We have previously reported phytoestrogen activity of blackcurrant anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-rutinoside) via the estrogen receptor (ER)α. In this study, we investigated the participation of ERβ in the phytoestrogen activity
[...] Read more.
Phytoestrogens are plant compounds with estrogenic effects found in many foods. We have previously reported phytoestrogen activity of blackcurrant anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-rutinoside) via the estrogen receptor (ER)α. In this study, we investigated the participation of ERβ in the phytoestrogen activity of these anthocyanins. Blackcurrant anthocyanin induced ERβ-mediated transcriptional activity, and the IC50 of ERβ was lower than that of ERα, indicating that blackcurrant anthocyanins have a higher binding affinity to ERβ. In silico docking analysis of cyanidin and delphinidin, the core portions of the compound that fits within the ligand-binding pocket of ERβ, showed that similarly to 17β-estradiol, hydrogen bonds formed with the ERβ residues Glu305, Arg346, and His475. No fitting placement of glucoside or rutinoside sugar chains within the ligand-binding pocket of ERβ-estradiol complex was detected. However, as the conformation of helices 3 and 12 in ERβ varies depending on the ligand, we suggest that the surrounding structure, including these helices, adopts a conformation capable of accommodating glucoside or rutinoside. Comparison of ERα and ERβ docking structures revealed that the selectivity for ERβ is higher than that for ERα, similar to genistein. These results show that blackcurrant anthocyanins exert phytoestrogen activity via ERβ. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Anthocyanin Research 2018)
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Open AccessArticle Antinociceptive and Antibacterial Properties of Anthocyanins and Flavonols from Fruits of Black and Non-Black Mulberries
Molecules 2018, 23(1), 4; doi:10.3390/molecules23010004
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 16 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
PDF Full-text (3102 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Anthocyanins and flavones are important pigments responsible for the coloration of fruits. Mulberry fruit is rich in anthocyanins and flavonols, which have multiple uses in traditional Chinese medicine. The antinociceptive and antibacterial activities of total flavonoids (TF) from black mulberry (MnTF, TF of
[...] Read more.
Anthocyanins and flavones are important pigments responsible for the coloration of fruits. Mulberry fruit is rich in anthocyanins and flavonols, which have multiple uses in traditional Chinese medicine. The antinociceptive and antibacterial activities of total flavonoids (TF) from black mulberry (MnTF, TF of Morus nigra) and non-black mulberry (MmTF, TF of Morus mongolica; and MazTF, TF of Morus alba ‘Zhenzhubai’) fruits were studied. MnTF was rich in anthocyanins (11.3 mg/g) and flavonols (0.7 mg/g) identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tunable ultraviolet/mass single-quadrupole detection (UPLC–TUV/QDa). Comparatively, MmTF and MazTF had low flavonol contents and MazTF had no anthocyanins. MnTF showed significantly higher antinociceptive and antibacterial activities toward Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus than MmTF and MazTF. MnTF inhibited the expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), phospho-p65 (p-p65) and phospho-IκBα (p-IκBα), and increased interleukin 10 (IL-10). Additionally, mice tests showed that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (C3G), rutin (Ru) and isoquercetin (IQ) were the main active ingredients in the antinociceptive process. Stronger antinociceptive effect of MnTF was correlated with its high content of anthocyanins and flavonols and its inhibitory effects on proinflammatory cytokines, iNOS and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway-related proteins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Anthocyanin Research 2018)
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