Special Issue "Fatigue Damage"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Filippo Berto

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Interests: fatigue of advanced and traditional materials; surface roughness; tribology; fracture mechanics; solid mechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Prevention of unexpected failures is a fundamental design objective in any engineering structure or system subjected to fatigue. Nevertheless, the complexity of modern structures and the interactivity among engineering systems, coupled with human fallibility means that failure and its consequences can only be avoided to a statistical probability. Hence, occasional catastrophic failures will occur with some of them involving the loss of human lives. Within the last few decades, a dramatic advancement has been achieved in many of the necessary technologies to either avoid or mitigate the consequences of failure. This advancement is associated with ever-increasing performance objectives for materials, structures, and machines, an increased complexity of engineered products and processes. Alongside this, catastrophic failure and its consequences are considered less tolerable in society as a whole; this ensures that efforts to prevent unexpected failures are now a cornerstone in modern engineering design and, simultaneously, a technological and scientific challenge. There is an increasing acknowledgement in the engineering community that the response to this challenge, that is, prevention of catastrophic failure, generally requires a systems approach and necessitates engagement of a large pool of multidisciplinary expertise and the deployment of tools for systems analysis. This multidisciplinary pool includes materials science, structural analysis, manufacturing technologies, quality control and evaluation, mathematics, physics, and probability and reliability. Furthermore, from the scientific point of view, there is also an increasing acknowledgement that addressing the complex engineering problems of today requires the use of concepts and approaches that can account for size and time scaling effects.

The Special Issue scope embraces interdisciplinary work aimed at understanding and deploying physics of fatigue and failure techniques, advancing experimental and theoretical failure analysis, modelling of the structural response with respect to both local and global failures, and structural design that accounts for scale and time effects in preventing engineering failures.

Prof. Filippo Berto
Guest Editor

 

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Keywords

  • fatigue
  • crack growth
  • design
  • assessment

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Fatigue Damage
Metals 2017, 7(10), 394; doi:10.3390/met7100394
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 25 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
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Abstract
Prevention of unexpected failures is a fundamental design objective in any engineering structure or system subjected to fatigue.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Physical-Mechanism Exploration of the Low-Cycle Unified Creep-Fatigue Formulation
Metals 2017, 7(9), 379; doi:10.3390/met7090379
Received: 18 August 2017 / Revised: 15 September 2017 / Accepted: 15 September 2017 / Published: 18 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3014 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background—Creep-fatigue behavior is identified as the incorporated effects of fatigue and creep. One class of constitutive-based models attempts to evaluate creep and fatigue separately, but the interaction of fatigue and creep is neglected. Other models treat the damage as a single component, but
[...] Read more.
Background—Creep-fatigue behavior is identified as the incorporated effects of fatigue and creep. One class of constitutive-based models attempts to evaluate creep and fatigue separately, but the interaction of fatigue and creep is neglected. Other models treat the damage as a single component, but the complex numerical structures that result are inconvenient for engineering application. The models derived through a curve-fitting method avoid these problems. However, the method of curving fitting cannot translate the numerical formulation to underlying physical mechanisms. Need—Therefore, there is a need to develop a new creep-fatigue formulation for metal that accommodates all relevant variables and where the relationships between them are consistent with physical mechanisms of fatigue and creep. Method—In the present work, the main dependencies and relationships for the unified creep-fatigue equation were presented through exploring what the literature says about the mechanisms. Outcomes—This shows that temperature, cyclic time and grain size have significant influences on creep-fatigue behavior, and the relationships between them (such as linear relation, logarithmical relation and power-law relation) are consistent with phenomena of diffusion creep and crack growth. Significantly, the numerical form of “1 − x” is presented to show the consumption of creep effect on fatigue capacity, and the introduction of the reference condition gives the threshold of creep effect. Originality—By this means, the unified creep-fatigue equation is linked to physical phenomena, where the influence of different dependencies on creep fatigue was explored and relationships shown in this equation were investigated in a microstructural level. Particularly, a physical explanation of the grain-size exponent via consideration of crack-growth planes was proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Experimental Investigation of Thermal Fatigue Die Casting Dies by Using Response Surface Modelling
Metals 2017, 7(6), 191; doi:10.3390/met7060191
Received: 7 March 2017 / Revised: 24 April 2017 / Accepted: 25 April 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
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Abstract
Mechanical and thermal sequences impact largely on thermo-mechanical fatigue of dies in a die casting operations. Innovative techniques to optimize the thermo-mechanical conditions of samples are major focus of researchers. This study investigates the typical thermal fatigue in die steel. Die surface initiation
[...] Read more.
Mechanical and thermal sequences impact largely on thermo-mechanical fatigue of dies in a die casting operations. Innovative techniques to optimize the thermo-mechanical conditions of samples are major focus of researchers. This study investigates the typical thermal fatigue in die steel. Die surface initiation and crack propagation were stimulated by thermal and hardness gradients, acting on the contact surface layer. A design of experiments (DOE) was developed to analyze the effect of as-machined surface roughness and die casting parameters on thermal fatigue properties. The experimental data were assessed on a thermo-mechanical fatigue life assessment model, being assisted by response surface methodology (RSM). The eminent valuation was grounded on the crack length, hardness properties and surface roughness due to thermal fatigue. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance method. Parameter optimization was conducted using response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the model, the optimal results of 26.5 μm crack length, 3.114 μm surface roughness, and 306 HV0.5 hardness properties were produced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Solution Treatment on Microstructure and High-Cycle Fatigue Properties of 7075 Aluminum Alloy
Metals 2017, 7(6), 193; doi:10.3390/met7060193
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 19 May 2017 / Accepted: 22 May 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (27125 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This research mainly focused on the effects of solution treatment on high-cycle fatigue properties, microstructure evolution, and fatigue fracture morphology of the high strength aluminum alloy (7075 aluminum alloy). The S-N curves and fatigue performance parameters of the alloy were obtained. We found
[...] Read more.
This research mainly focused on the effects of solution treatment on high-cycle fatigue properties, microstructure evolution, and fatigue fracture morphology of the high strength aluminum alloy (7075 aluminum alloy). The S-N curves and fatigue performance parameters of the alloy were obtained. We found that longer solution treatment time significantly influences the high-cycle (N ≥ 105) fatigue properties of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy. Under the loading stress of 240 MPa, and the solution treatment of 2 h compared to 1.5 h, 1 h, and 0.5 h, the fatigue life was respectively improved by about 95.7%, 149%, and 359%. The microstructure observations conducted with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are as follows: recrystallization occurs in the grains of the 7075 aluminum alloy under solution treatment, and the grains become large with the length of the solution treatment time. Cracks mainly initiate from the undissolved large phases, and prolonging the solution time can effectively promote the dissolution of the T phase and S phase, decrease the number of dislocations, and lower the rate of the initiation of fatigue cracks at the undissolved large phases due to dislocation glide and dislocation pile-up. In the second stage of crack propagation, the secondary cracks reduce the driving force and the rate of crack propagation, promoting the fatigue properties of the 7075 aluminum alloy, which can be verified by the observation result that fatigue striation widths become narrower with longer solution treatment times. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Life of Ti-6Al-4V Treated by Vibratory Stress Relief
Metals 2017, 7(5), 158; doi:10.3390/met7050158
Received: 1 April 2017 / Revised: 28 April 2017 / Accepted: 28 April 2017 / Published: 3 May 2017
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Abstract
Vibratory stress relief (VSR) is a highly efficient and low-energy consumption method to relieve and homogenize residual stresses in materials. Thus, the effect of VSR on the fatigue life should be determined. Standard fatigue specimens are fabricated to investigate the fatigue life of
[...] Read more.
Vibratory stress relief (VSR) is a highly efficient and low-energy consumption method to relieve and homogenize residual stresses in materials. Thus, the effect of VSR on the fatigue life should be determined. Standard fatigue specimens are fabricated to investigate the fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy treated by VSR. The dynamic stresses generated under different VSR amplitudes are measured, and then the relationship between the dynamic stress and vibration amplitude is obtained. Different specimen groups are subjected to VSRs with different amplitudes and annealing treatment with typical process parameters. Residual stresses are measured to evaluate the stress relieving effects. Finally, the fatigue behavior under different states is determined by uniaxial tension–compression fatigue experiments. Results show that VSR and annealing treatment have negative effects on the fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V. The fatigue life is decreased with the increase in VSR amplitude. When the VSR amplitude is less than 0.1 mm, the decrease in fatigue limit is less than 2%. Compared with specimens without VSR or annealing treatment, the fatigue limit of the specimens treated by VSR with 0.2 mm amplitude and annealing treatment decreases by 10.60% and 8.52%, respectively. Although the stress relieving effect is better, high amplitude VSR will lead to the decrease of Ti-6Al-4V fatigue life due to the defects generated during vibration. Low amplitude VSR can effectively relieve the stress with little decrease in fatigue life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle High-Cycle Microscopic Severe Corrosion Fatigue Behavior and Life Prediction of 25CrMo Steel Used in Railway Axles
Metals 2017, 7(4), 134; doi:10.3390/met7040134
Received: 18 January 2017 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 7 April 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
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Abstract
The effects of environmental media on the corrosion fatigue fracture behavior of 25CrMo steel were investigated. The media include air, and 3.5 wt % and 5.0 wt % NaCl solutions. Experimental results indicate that the media induces the initiation of corrosion fatigue cracks
[...] Read more.
The effects of environmental media on the corrosion fatigue fracture behavior of 25CrMo steel were investigated. The media include air, and 3.5 wt % and 5.0 wt % NaCl solutions. Experimental results indicate that the media induces the initiation of corrosion fatigue cracks at multiple sites. The multi-cracking sites cause changes in the crack growth directions, the crack growth rate during the coupling action of the media, and the stress amplitude. The coupling effects are important for engineering applications and research. The probability and predictions of the corrosion fatigue characteristic life can be estimated using the three-parameter Weibull distribution function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Very High Cycle Fatigue of Butt-Welded High-Strength Steel Plate
Metals 2017, 7(3), 103; doi:10.3390/met7030103
Received: 2 January 2017 / Revised: 2 March 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 21 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5832 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Welded parts fabricated from high-strength steel (HSS) require an almost infinite lifetime, i.e., a gigacycle (109). Therefore, it is necessary to test its high-cycle fatigue behavior. In this paper, an accelerated fatigue test method using ultrasonic resonance is proposed. This method
[...] Read more.
Welded parts fabricated from high-strength steel (HSS) require an almost infinite lifetime, i.e., a gigacycle (109). Therefore, it is necessary to test its high-cycle fatigue behavior. In this paper, an accelerated fatigue test method using ultrasonic resonance is proposed. This method reduces the experimental time required in comparison with a conventional fatigue test setup. The operating principle of the accelerated ultrasonic fatigue test involved the use of a 20-kHz resonant frequency. Therefore, it was necessary to design a specimen specifically for the test setup. In the study, ultrasonic fatigue testing equipment was used to test butt-welded 590- and 780-MPa ferrite–bainite steel plates. In order to design the specimen, a dynamic Young’s modulus was measured using piezoelectric element, a laser Doppler vibrometer, and a digital signal analyzer. The S–N curves of fatigue behavior of the original and butt-welded specimens were compared. The fatigue test results showed that the infinite (i.e., gigacycle) fatigue strengths of the welded specimens were approximately 8% less than those of the original specimen.
Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Fatigue and Fracture Resistance of Heavy-Section Ferritic Ductile Cast Iron
Metals 2017, 7(3), 88; doi:10.3390/met7030088
Received: 15 February 2017 / Revised: 1 March 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 10 March 2017
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Abstract
In this paper, we explore the effect of a long solidification time (12 h) on the mechanical properties of an EN-GJS-400-type ferritic ductile cast iron (DCI). For this purpose, static tensile, rotating bending fatigue, fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests are carried
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we explore the effect of a long solidification time (12 h) on the mechanical properties of an EN-GJS-400-type ferritic ductile cast iron (DCI). For this purpose, static tensile, rotating bending fatigue, fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests are carried out on specimens extracted from the same casting. The obtained results are compared with those of similar materials published in the technical literature. Moreover, the discussion is complemented with metallurgical and fractographic analyses. It has been found that the long solidification time, representative of conditions arising in heavy-section castings, leads to an overgrowth of the graphite nodules and a partial degeneration into chunky graphite. With respect to minimum values prescribed for thick-walled (t > 60 mm) EN-GJS-400-15, the reduction in tensile strength and total elongation is equal to 20% and 75%, respectively. The rotating bending fatigue limit is reduced by 30% with respect to the standard EN-1563, reporting the results of fatigue tests employing laboratory samples extracted from thin-walled castings. Conversely, the resistance to fatigue crack growth is even superior and the fracture toughness comparable to that of conventional DCI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Surface Characteristics and Fatigue Behavior of Gradient Nano-Structured Magnesium Alloy
Metals 2017, 7(2), 62; doi:10.3390/met7020062
Received: 22 December 2016 / Revised: 13 February 2017 / Accepted: 14 February 2017 / Published: 20 February 2017
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Abstract
High-frequency impacting and rolling was applied on AZ31B magnesium alloy to obtain a gradient nano-structured surface. Surface characteristics were experimentally investigated, and the nanocrystallization mechanism is discussed in detail. Results showed that the gradient nano-structure with the characteristics of work hardening, compressive residual
[...] Read more.
High-frequency impacting and rolling was applied on AZ31B magnesium alloy to obtain a gradient nano-structured surface. Surface characteristics were experimentally investigated, and the nanocrystallization mechanism is discussed in detail. Results showed that the gradient nano-structure with the characteristics of work hardening, compressive residual stress and a smooth surface was induced on the treated surface. Grains on the top surface were generally refined to around 20 nm. Twins, dislocations and dynamic recrystallization dominated the grain refinement process. Fatigue strength of the treated specimens corresponding to 107 cycles was increased by 28.6% compared to that of the as-received specimens. The work hardened layer induced by high-frequency impacting and rolling is the major reason to improve fatigue life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Role of Microstructure Heterogeneity on Fatigue Crack Propagation of Low-Alloyed PM Steels in the As-Sintered Condition
Metals 2017, 7(2), 60; doi:10.3390/met7020060
Received: 17 November 2016 / Revised: 3 February 2017 / Accepted: 14 February 2017 / Published: 17 February 2017
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Abstract
Due to their lower production costs, powder metallurgy (PM) steels are increasingly being considered for replacing wrought counterparts. Nevertheless, the presence of a non-negligible volume fraction of porosity in typical PM steels makes their use difficult, especially in applications where cyclic loading is
[...] Read more.
Due to their lower production costs, powder metallurgy (PM) steels are increasingly being considered for replacing wrought counterparts. Nevertheless, the presence of a non-negligible volume fraction of porosity in typical PM steels makes their use difficult, especially in applications where cyclic loading is involved. On the other hand, PM offers the possibility of obtaining steel microstructures that cannot be found in wrought. Indeed, by adequately using alloying strategies based on admixing, pre-alloying, diffusion bonding or combinations of those, it is possible to tailor the final microstructure to obtain a distribution of phases that could possibly increase the fatigue resistance of PM steel components. Therefore, a detailed study of the effect of different microstructural phases on fatigue crack propagation in PM steels was performed using admixed nickel PM steels (FN0208) as well as pre-alloyed PM steels (FL5208). Specimens were pressed and sintered to a density of 7.3 g/cm3 in order to specifically investigate the effect of matrix microstructure on fatigue properties. Fatigue crack growth rates were measured at four different R-ratios, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 for both PM steels. The negative effect of increasing the R-ratio on fatigue properties was observed for both alloys. The crack propagation path was characterized using quantitative image analysis of fracture surfaces. Measurements of roughness profile and volume fractions of each phase along the crack path were made to determine the preferred crack path. Weak Ni-rich ferritic rings in the FN0208 series (heterogeneous microstructure) caused a larger crack deflection compared to the more homogeneous microstructure of the FL5208 series. It was determined that, contrary to results reported in literature, crack propagation does not pass through retained austenite areas even though fatigue cracks propagated predominantly along prior particle boundaries, i.e., intergranular fracture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Methods for Estimation of Cyclic Stress-Strain Parameters from Monotonic Properties of Steels
Metals 2017, 7(1), 17; doi:10.3390/met7010017
Received: 11 November 2016 / Revised: 28 December 2016 / Accepted: 30 December 2016 / Published: 7 January 2017
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Abstract
Most existing methods for estimation of cyclic yield stress and cyclic Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain parameters of steels from their monotonic properties were developed on relatively modest number of material datasets and without considerations of the particularities of different steel subgroups formed according to their
[...] Read more.
Most existing methods for estimation of cyclic yield stress and cyclic Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain parameters of steels from their monotonic properties were developed on relatively modest number of material datasets and without considerations of the particularities of different steel subgroups formed according to their chemical composition (unalloyed, low-alloy, and high-alloy steels) or delivery, i.e., testing condition. Furthermore, some methods were evaluated using the same datasets that were used for their development. In this paper, a comprehensive statistical analysis and evaluation of existing estimation methods were performed using an independent set of experimental material data compriseding 116 steels. Results of performed statistical analyses reveal that statistically significant differences exist among unalloyed, low-alloy, and high-alloy steels regarding their cyclic yield stress and cyclic Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain parameters. Therefore, estimation methods were evaluated separately for mentioned steel subgroups in order to more precisely determine their applicability for the estimation of cyclic behavior of steels belonging to individual subgroups. Evaluations revealed that considering all steels as a single group results in averaging and that subgroups should be treated independently. Based on results of performed statistical analysis, guidelines are provided for identification and selection of suitable methods to be applied for the estimation of cyclic stress-strain parameters of steels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Pre-Fatigue on the Monotonic Deformation Behavior of a Coplanar Double-Slip-Oriented Cu Single Crystal
Metals 2016, 6(11), 293; doi:10.3390/met6110293
Received: 4 October 2016 / Revised: 13 November 2016 / Accepted: 17 November 2016 / Published: 22 November 2016
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Abstract
The [2¯33] coplanar double-slip-oriented Cu single crystals were pre-fatigued up to a saturation stage and then uniaxially tensioned or compressed to fracture. The results show that for the specimen pre-fatigued at a plastic strain amplitude γpl of 9.2
[...] Read more.
The [ 2 ¯ 33 ] coplanar double-slip-oriented Cu single crystals were pre-fatigued up to a saturation stage and then uniaxially tensioned or compressed to fracture. The results show that for the specimen pre-fatigued at a plastic strain amplitude γpl of 9.2 × 104, which is located within the quasi-plateau of the cyclic stress-strain (CSS) curve, its tensile strength and elongation are coincidently improved, showing an obvious strengthening effect by low-cycle fatigue (LCF) training. However, for the crystal specimens pre-fatigued at a γpl lower or higher than the quasi-plateau region, due to a low pre-cyclic hardening or the pre-induction of fatigue damage, no marked strengthening effect by LCF training occurs, and even a weakening effect by LCF damage takes place instead. In contrast, the effect of pre-fatigue deformation on the uniaxial compressive behavior is not so significant, since the compressive deformation is in a stress state more beneficial to the ongoing plastic deformation and it is insensitive to the damage induced by pre-cycling. Based on the observations and comparisons of deformation features and dislocation structures in the uniaxially deformed [ 2 ¯ 33 ] crystal specimens which have been pre-fatigued at different γpl, the micro-mechanisms for the effect of pre-fatigue on the static mechanical behavior are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle The Unified Creep-Fatigue Equation for Stainless Steel 316
Metals 2016, 6(9), 219; doi:10.3390/met6090219
Received: 1 August 2016 / Revised: 23 August 2016 / Accepted: 2 September 2016 / Published: 10 September 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3161 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background—The creep-fatigue properties of stainless steel 316 are of interest because of the wide use of this material in demanding service environments, such as the nuclear industry. Need—A number of models exist to describe creep-fatigue behaviours, but they are limited by the need
[...] Read more.
Background—The creep-fatigue properties of stainless steel 316 are of interest because of the wide use of this material in demanding service environments, such as the nuclear industry. Need—A number of models exist to describe creep-fatigue behaviours, but they are limited by the need to obtain specialized coefficients from a large number of experiments, which are time-consuming and expensive. Also, they do not generalise to other situations of temperature and frequency. There is a need for improved formulations for creep-fatigue, with coefficients that determinable directly from the existing and simple creep-fatigue tests and creep rupture tests. Outcomes—A unified creep-fatigue equation is proposed, based on an extension of the Coffin-Manson equation, to introduce dependencies on temperature and frequency. The equation may be formulated for strain as ε p = C 0 c ( T , t , ε p ) N β 0 , or as a power-law ε p = C 0 c ( T , t ) N β 0 b ( T , t ) . These were then validated against existing experimental data. The equations provide an excellent fit to data (r2 = 0.97 or better). Originality—This work develops a novel formulation for creep-fatigue that accommodates temperature and frequency. The coefficients can be obtained with minimum experimental effort, being based on standard rather than specialized tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle Understanding Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 Base Metal and Weldments at 900 °C
Metals 2016, 6(8), 178; doi:10.3390/met6080178
Received: 4 July 2016 / Revised: 25 July 2016 / Accepted: 26 July 2016 / Published: 2 August 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (7821 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to better understand the high temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 weldments, this work focuses on the comparative study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 base metal and weldments, made from automated gas tungsten arc welding
[...] Read more.
In order to better understand the high temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 weldments, this work focuses on the comparative study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 base metal and weldments, made from automated gas tungsten arc welding with Alloy 617 filler wire. Low cycle fatigue tests were carried out by a series of fully reversed strain-controls (strain ratio, Rε = −1), i.e., 0.6%, 0.9%, 1.2% and 1.5% at a high temperature of 900 °C and a constant strain rate of 10−3/s. At all the testing conditions, the weldment specimens showed lower fatigue lives compared with the base metal due to their microstructural heterogeneities. The effect of very high temperature deformation behavior regarding cyclic stress response varied as a complex function of material property and total strain range. The Alloy 617 base weldments showed some cyclic hardening as a function of total strain range. However, the Alloy 617 base metal showed some cyclic softening induced by solute drag creep during low cycle fatigue. An analysis of the low cycle fatigue data based on a Coffin-Manson relationship was carried out. Fracture surface characterizations were performed on selected fractured specimens using standard metallographic techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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Open AccessArticle The Effects of Corrosive Media on Fatigue Performance of Structural Aluminum Alloys
Metals 2016, 6(7), 160; doi:10.3390/met6070160
Received: 3 June 2016 / Revised: 3 July 2016 / Accepted: 7 July 2016 / Published: 13 July 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3840 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effects of corrosive media on rotating bending fatigue lives (the cyclic numbers from 104 to 108) of different aluminum alloys were investigated, which involved the corrosion fatigue lives of five kinds of aluminum alloys in air, at 3.5 wt.
[...] Read more.
The effects of corrosive media on rotating bending fatigue lives (the cyclic numbers from 104 to 108) of different aluminum alloys were investigated, which involved the corrosion fatigue lives of five kinds of aluminum alloys in air, at 3.5 wt. % and 5.0 wt. % NaCl aqueous solutions. Experimental results indicate that corrosive media have different harmful influences on fatigue lives of different aluminum alloys, in which the differences of corrosion fatigue lives depend strongly on the plastic property (such as the elongation parameter) of aluminum alloys and whether to exist with and without fracture mode II. The other various influence factors (such as the dropping corrosive liquid rate, the loading style, and the nondimensionalization of strength) of corrosion fatigue lives in three media were also discussed in detail by using the typical cases. Furthermore, fracture morphologies and characteristics of samples, which showed the different fatigue cracking behaviors of aluminum alloys in three media, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage)
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