E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Dendrimers in Medicine"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammad Najlah

Faculty of Medical Science, Anglia Ruskin University, Bishops Hall Lane, Chelmsford CM1 1SQ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: dendritic prodrugs/conjugates; polymeric nano-particulates; multifunctional nanomedicines; colloidal formulations; drug solubility; pulmonary delivery and targeting cancer stem cells.
Guest Editor
Prof. Antony D’Emanuele

Leicester School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: polymeric delivery systems (including dendrimer, biodegradable and hydrogel systems); nanomedicines; responsive drug delivery technologies; controlled drug delivery technologies; colloidal formulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dendrimers, having precise nanostructures with synthetic control over: size, shape, and surface chemistry, are currently receiving great attention in a wide range of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications such as gene transfection, drug solubilisation, immunoassay, magnetic resonance imaging, chelating agents, and drug delivery. These highly branched macromolecules—described as having a well-defined, homogeneous, and monodisperse nanostructure—have a typically symmetric core, an inner shell, and terminal functional groups. The unique chemistry of dendrimers offers great opportunities to be tailored/engineered to facilitate drug conjugation (prodrug), drug encapsulation and/or surface modification with designed moieties that exhibit desired properties such as targeting, long circulation, etc. This Special Issue will provide a platform for presenting the latest research results on dendrimer applications in medicine.

Dr. Mohammad Najlah
Prof. Antony D’Emanuele
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dendrimers
  • Drug delivery
  • Biodegradable
  • Targeting
  • Biocompatible
  • Functional groups
  • Solubility
  • Targeting
  • Bioavailability
  • Conjugation
  • Encapsulation

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle In Vitro Evaluation of Third Generation PAMAM Dendrimer Conjugates
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1661; doi:10.3390/molecules22101661
Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 30 September 2017 / Published: 4 October 2017
PDF Full-text (3202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study compares the use of high generation G3 and low generation G0 Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as drug carriers of naproxen (NAP), a poorly water soluble drug. Naproxen was conjugated to G3 in different ratios and to G0 in a 1:1 ratio
[...] Read more.
The present study compares the use of high generation G3 and low generation G0 Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as drug carriers of naproxen (NAP), a poorly water soluble drug. Naproxen was conjugated to G3 in different ratios and to G0 in a 1:1 ratio via a diethylene glycol linker. A lauroyl chain (L), a lipophilic permeability enhancer, was attached to G3 and G0 prodrugs. The G3 and G0 conjugates were more hydrophilic than naproxen as evaluated by the measurement of partitioning between 1-octanol and a phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 and pH 1.2. The unmodified surface PAMAM-NAP conjugates showed significant solubility enhancements of NAP at pH 1.2; however, with the number of NAP conjugated to G3, this was limited to 10 molecules. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay indicated that the G3 dendrimer conjugates had a concentration dependent toxicity towards Caco-2 cells. Attaching naproxen to the surface of the dendrimer increased the IC50 of the resulting prodrugs towards Caco-2 cells. The lauroyl G3 conjugates showed the highest toxicity amongst the PAMAM dendrimer conjugates investigated and were significantly more toxic than the lauroyl-G0-naproxen conjugates. The permeability of naproxen across monolayers of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased by its conjugation to either G3 or G0 PAMAM dendrimers. Lauroyl-G0 conjugates displayed considerably lower cytotoxicity than G3 conjugates and may be preferable for use as a drug carrier for low soluble drugs such as naproxen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendrimers in Medicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Function Oriented Molecular Design: Dendrimers as Novel Antimicrobials
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1581; doi:10.3390/molecules22101581
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 8 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 September 2017 / Published: 21 September 2017
PDF Full-text (1670 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years innovative nanostructures are attracting increasing interest and, among them, dendrimers have shown several fields of application. Dendrimers can be designed and modified in plentiful ways giving rise to hundreds of different molecules with specific characteristics and functionalities. Biomedicine is probably
[...] Read more.
In recent years innovative nanostructures are attracting increasing interest and, among them, dendrimers have shown several fields of application. Dendrimers can be designed and modified in plentiful ways giving rise to hundreds of different molecules with specific characteristics and functionalities. Biomedicine is probably the field where these molecules find extraordinary applicability, and this is probably due to their multi-valency and to the fact that several other chemicals can be coupled to them to obtain desired compounds. In this review we will describe the different production strategies and the tools and technologies for the study of their characteristics. Finally, we provide a panoramic overview of their applications to meet biomedical needs, especially their use as novel antimicrobials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendrimers in Medicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Radiolabeled Dendrimers for Nuclear Medicine Applications
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1350; doi:10.3390/molecules22091350
Received: 13 July 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 10 August 2017 / Published: 25 August 2017
PDF Full-text (7281 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent advances in nuclear medicine have explored nanoscale carriers for targeted delivery of various radionuclides in specific manners to improve the effect of diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Due to the unique molecular architecture allowing facile attachment of targeting ligands and radionuclides, dendrimers
[...] Read more.
Recent advances in nuclear medicine have explored nanoscale carriers for targeted delivery of various radionuclides in specific manners to improve the effect of diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Due to the unique molecular architecture allowing facile attachment of targeting ligands and radionuclides, dendrimers provide versatile platforms in this filed to build abundant multifunctional radiolabeled nanoparticles for nuclear medicine applications. This review gives special focus to recent advances in dendrimer-based nuclear medicine agents for the imaging and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular and other diseases. Radiolabeling strategies for different radionuclides and several challenges involved in clinical translation of radiolabeled dendrimers are extensively discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendrimers in Medicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Dendrimers as Nanocarriers for Nucleic Acid and Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1401; doi:10.3390/molecules22091401
Received: 31 July 2017 / Revised: 18 August 2017 / Accepted: 21 August 2017 / Published: 23 August 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1316 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dendrimers are highly branched polymers with easily modifiable surfaces. This makes them promising structures for functionalization and also for conjugation with drugs and DNA/RNA. Their architecture, which can be controlled by different synthesis processes, allows the control of characteristics such as shape, size,
[...] Read more.
Dendrimers are highly branched polymers with easily modifiable surfaces. This makes them promising structures for functionalization and also for conjugation with drugs and DNA/RNA. Their architecture, which can be controlled by different synthesis processes, allows the control of characteristics such as shape, size, charge, and solubility. Dendrimers have the ability to increase the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. The drugs can be entrapped in the intramolecular cavity of the dendrimers or conjugated to their functional groups at their surface. Nucleic acids usually form complexes with the positively charged surface of most cationic dendrimers and this approach has been extensively employed. The presence of functional groups in the dendrimer’s exterior also permits the addition of other moieties that can actively target certain diseases and improve delivery, for instance, with folate and antibodies, now widely used as tumor targeting strategies. Dendrimers have been investigated extensively in the medical field, and cancer treatment is one of the greatest areas where they have been most used. This review will consider the main types of dendrimer currently being explored and how they can be utilized as drug and gene carriers and functionalized to improve the delivery of cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendrimers in Medicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top