E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yoke Khin Yap

Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 118 Fisher Hall, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, Michigan, 49931-1295, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 906 4872933
Interests: nanotubes; graphene; nanosheets; nanowires; quantum dots; quantum electronics, biological sensing; chemical sensing; plasmonic; energy harvesting; heat management
Guest Editor
Dr. Dongyan Zhang

Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 118 Fisher Hall, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, Michigan, 49931-1295, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 906 4872900
Fax: +1 906 4872933
Interests: microbiology; biochemistry; immunology; molecular biology; biotechnology; and bio-nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecules are the basis of many chemical and biological reactions. The detection of chemical and biological molecules using novel sensing methodology has gained increasing interest as it leads to earlier detection of toxicant, bacterias, viruses, proteins, DNAs and illnesses such as cancer. These molecular sensing devices may also lead to the development of artificial organs (nose, eye, tongue, etc.).

On the other hand, molecules are the smallest possible building blocks for the next generation electronic devices. These devices can be used for various purposes, including storage, switching and brain-like data processing, and are generally referred to as molecular electronics or molectronics.

To emphasize the importance of molecular sensing and molecular electronics, review articles and original research papers relating to these burgeoning areas are solicited. There is particular interest in manuscripts concerning biological and chemical sensing as well as novel approaches in constructing molecular electronics using the top-down (via micro and nano lithography) and the bottom up (via nanotubes, graphene, nanowires, nanoparticles, etc.) techniques.

Prof. Dr. Yoke Khin Yap
Dr. Dongyan Zhang
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • sensors
  • actuators
  • microfluidics
  • molecular electronics
  • nanotubes
  • graphene
  • nanowires
  • nanoparticles

Published Papers (9 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-9
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Synthesis of a Cu2+-Selective Probe Derived from Rhodamine and Its Application in Cell Imaging
Sensors 2014, 14(11), 21375-21384; doi:10.3390/s141121375
Received: 15 August 2014 / Revised: 4 November 2014 / Accepted: 5 November 2014 / Published: 12 November 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A new fluorescent probe P based on rhodamine for Cu2+ was synthesized and characterized. The new probe P showed high selectivity to Cu2+ over other tested metal ions. With optimal conditions, the proposed probe P worked in a wide linear range
[...] Read more.
A new fluorescent probe P based on rhodamine for Cu2+ was synthesized and characterized. The new probe P showed high selectivity to Cu2+ over other tested metal ions. With optimal conditions, the proposed probe P worked in a wide linear range of 1.0 × 106–1.0 × 105 M with a detection limit of 3.3 × 10−7 M Cu2+ in ethanol-water solution (9:1, v:v, 20 mM HEPES, pH 7.0). Furthermore, it has been used for imaging of Cu2+ in living cells with satisfying results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Nitrogen-Rich Multinuclear Ferrocenophanes as Multichannel Chemosensor Molecules for Transition and Heavy-Metal Cations
Sensors 2014, 14(8), 14339-14355; doi:10.3390/s140814339
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 23 July 2014 / Accepted: 27 July 2014 / Published: 7 August 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4768 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
[m.n] Multinuclear ferrocenophanes prepared by aza-Wittig reaction of bisiminophosphoranes derived from 1,1'-diazidoferrocene and isophthaladelhyde or 2,5-diformylthiophene, behave as efficient electrochemical and chromogenic chemosensor molecules for Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations. Whereas the OSWV of receptor 3,
[...] Read more.
[m.n] Multinuclear ferrocenophanes prepared by aza-Wittig reaction of bisiminophosphoranes derived from 1,1'-diazidoferrocene and isophthaladelhyde or 2,5-diformylthiophene, behave as efficient electrochemical and chromogenic chemosensor molecules for Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations. Whereas the OSWV of receptor 3, bearing two m-phenylene units in the bridges, display one oxidation peak, receptor 4 incorporating two thiophene rings in the bridges, exhibits two well-separated oxidation peaks. In both receptors only the addition of Zn2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ metal cations induced a remarkable anodic shift of ferrocene/ferrocenium redox couple. Likewise, in the absorption spectra of these receptors the low energy band is red-shifted by Δλ = 165 − 209 nm, and these changes promoted a significant color changes which could be used for the naked eye detection of these metal cations. The coordination modes for two representative cases were unveiled by DFT calculations that show an unsual coordination in the [42Pb]2+ complex with the Pb2+ cation in a distorted cubic N4S4 donor cage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Open AccessArticle Anion Binding Studies on Receptors Derived from the Indolo[2,3-a]carbazole Scaffold Having Different Binding Cavity Sizes
Sensors 2014, 14(8), 14038-14049; doi:10.3390/s140814038
Received: 4 July 2014 / Revised: 25 July 2014 / Accepted: 28 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
PDF Full-text (1042 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The indolo[2,3-a]carbazole scaffold is a fused polyheteroaromatic system bearing two NH groups which suitably converge as hydrogen bond donor sites for the recognition of anions. A simple derivatisation of the indolocarbazole system at positions 1 and 10 with different functional groups,
[...] Read more.
The indolo[2,3-a]carbazole scaffold is a fused polyheteroaromatic system bearing two NH groups which suitably converge as hydrogen bond donor sites for the recognition of anions. A simple derivatisation of the indolocarbazole system at positions 1 and 10 with different functional groups, namely alcohols and amides, has contributed to modulate the anion binding selectivity and sensibility. A particularly good response has been obtained for the benzoate anion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Electrophoresis-Enhanced Detection of Deoxyribonucleic Acids on a Membrane-Based Lateral Flow Strip Using Avian Influenza H5 Genetic Sequence as the Model
Sensors 2014, 14(3), 4399-4415; doi:10.3390/s140304399
Received: 9 December 2013 / Revised: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 28 February 2014 / Published: 5 March 2014
PDF Full-text (1451 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study reports a simple strategy to detect a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on a membrane-based lateral flow (MBLF) strip without tedious gel preparation, gel electrophoresis, and EtBr-staining processes. The method also enhances the detection signal of the genetic sample. A direct electric field
[...] Read more.
This study reports a simple strategy to detect a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on a membrane-based lateral flow (MBLF) strip without tedious gel preparation, gel electrophoresis, and EtBr-staining processes. The method also enhances the detection signal of the genetic sample. A direct electric field was applied over two ends of the MBLF strips to induce an electrophoresis of DNAs through the strips. The signal enhancement was demonstrated by the detection of the H5 subtype of avian influenza virus (H5 AIV). This approach showed an excellent selectivity of H5 AIV from other two control species, Arabidopsis thaliana and human PSMA5. It also showed an effective signal repeatability and sensitivity over a series of analyte concentrations. Its detection limit could be enhanced, from 40 ng to 0.1 ng by applying 12 V. The nano-gold particles for the color development were labeled on the capture antibody, and UV-VIS and TEM were used to check if the labeling was successful. This detection strategy could be further developed to apply on the detection of drug-allergic genes at clinics or detection of infectious substances at incident sites by a simple manipulation with an aid of a mini-PCR machine and auxiliary kits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics
Sensors 2014, 14(11), 20602-20619; doi:10.3390/s141120602
Received: 14 July 2014 / Revised: 11 September 2014 / Accepted: 27 October 2014 / Published: 31 October 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (583 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as
[...] Read more.
Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Figures

Open AccessReview Recent Advances in the Field of Bionanotechnology: An Insight into Optoelectric Bacteriorhodopsin, Quantum Dots, and Noble Metal Nanoclusters
Sensors 2014, 14(10), 19731-19766; doi:10.3390/s141019731
Received: 29 August 2014 / Revised: 8 October 2014 / Accepted: 15 October 2014 / Published: 22 October 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3146 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Molecular sensors and molecular electronics are a major component of a recent research area known as bionanotechnology, which merges biology with nanotechnology. This new class of biosensors and bioelectronics has been a subject of intense research over the past decade and has found
[...] Read more.
Molecular sensors and molecular electronics are a major component of a recent research area known as bionanotechnology, which merges biology with nanotechnology. This new class of biosensors and bioelectronics has been a subject of intense research over the past decade and has found application in a wide variety of fields. The unique characteristics of these biomolecular transduction systems has been utilized in applications ranging from solar cells and single-electron transistors (SETs) to fluorescent sensors capable of sensitive and selective detection of a wide variety of targets, both organic and inorganic. This review will discuss three major systems in the area of molecular sensors and electronics and their application in unique technological innovations. Firstly, the synthesis of optoelectric bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and its application in the field of molecular sensors and electronics will be discussed. Next, this article will discuss recent advances in the synthesis and application of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Finally, this article will conclude with a review of the new and exciting field of noble metal nanoclusters and their application in the creation of a new class of fluorescent sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Open AccessReview Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics
Sensors 2014, 14(9), 17655-17685; doi:10.3390/s140917655
Received: 4 August 2014 / Revised: 1 September 2014 / Accepted: 3 September 2014 / Published: 22 September 2014
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (2383 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current
[...] Read more.
With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Open AccessReview The Intersection of CMOS Microsystems and Upconversion Nanoparticles for Luminescence Bioimaging and Bioassays
Sensors 2014, 14(9), 16829-16855; doi:10.3390/s140916829
Received: 24 July 2014 / Revised: 27 August 2014 / Accepted: 2 September 2014 / Published: 10 September 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2821 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs
[...] Read more.
Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)
Figures

Open AccessReview Experimental Tools to Study Molecular Recognition within the Nanoparticle Corona
Sensors 2014, 14(9), 16196-16211; doi:10.3390/s140916196
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 15 August 2014 / Accepted: 18 August 2014 / Published: 2 September 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (3395 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Advancements in optical nanosensor development have enabled the design of sensors using synthetic molecular recognition elements through a recently developed method called Corona Phase Molecular Recognition (CoPhMoRe). The synthetic sensors resulting from these design principles are highly selective for specific analytes, and demonstrate
[...] Read more.
Advancements in optical nanosensor development have enabled the design of sensors using synthetic molecular recognition elements through a recently developed method called Corona Phase Molecular Recognition (CoPhMoRe). The synthetic sensors resulting from these design principles are highly selective for specific analytes, and demonstrate remarkable stability for use under a variety of conditions. An essential element of nanosensor development hinges on the ability to understand the interface between nanoparticles and the associated corona phase surrounding the nanosensor, an environment outside of the range of traditional characterization tools, such as NMR. This review discusses the need for new strategies and instrumentation to study the nanoparticle corona, operating in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Approaches to instrumentation must have the capacity to concurrently monitor nanosensor operation and the molecular changes in the corona phase. A detailed overview of new tools for the understanding of CoPhMoRe mechanisms is provided for future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing and Molecular Electronics)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sensors Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
sensors@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Sensors
Back to Top