Special Issue "Two-Dimensional Electronics and Optoelectronics"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2017)

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yoke Khin Yap

Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 118 Fisher Hall, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, Michigan, 49931-1295, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 906 4872933
Interests: nanotubes; graphene; nanosheets; nanowires; quantum dots; quantum electronics, biological sensing; chemical sensing; plasmonic; energy harvesting; heat management
Guest Editor
Dr. Zhixian Zhou

Associate Professor of Department of Physics & Astronomy, Wayne State University, 135 Physics Bldg., Detroit, MI 48201, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: 2D Materials; 2D electronics; heterostructures; transistors; WSe2; MoS2; MoSe2

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is intended to present scholarly papers that address some critical questions arising from two-dimensional (2D) electronic materials and devices. Two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), and black phosphorus have emerged as promising electronic and optoelectronic materials. These 2D materials cover a broad spectrum of electronic properties, ranging from metal, semimetals, semiconductors, to insulators. Furthermore, different 2D materials with diverse electrical and optical properties can be artificially stacked together by van der Waals assembly without the constraints of atomic commensurability, which opens up unpresented opportunities for creating a large number of heterostructures with emerging properties not present in their constituent materials. The topics covered in this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the synthesis, electronic and thermal transport, optoelectronics and photonics, spintronics and valleytronics and various complex phenomena (e.g., superconductivity and charge density waves). We invite contribution from experimentalists and theorists to submit their high-quality manuscript for publication in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Yoke Khin Yap
Dr. Zhixian Zhou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 2D materials, graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, transitional metal dichalcogenides, black phosphorus
  • Heterostructures, van der Waals
  • Electronics, optoelectronics, photonics
  • Synthesis, device fabrication, electronic and thermal transport
  • Spintronics, vallytronics
  • Superconductivity, charge density waves, quantum phenomena
  • Contact engineering, Schottky barrier
  • Mobility, scattering, phonon, impurities
  • Dielectric integration, capacitance

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Two-Dimensional Electronics and Optoelectronics: Present and Future
Electronics 2017, 6(3), 53; doi:10.3390/electronics6030053
Received: 18 July 2017 / Revised: 18 July 2017 / Accepted: 19 July 2017 / Published: 22 July 2017
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Abstract
Since the successful isolation of graphene a little over a decade ago, a wide variety of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have been studied.[...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle High Throughput Characterization of Epitaxially Grown Single-Layer MoS2
Electronics 2017, 6(2), 28; doi:10.3390/electronics6020028
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2685 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The growth of single-layer MoS2 with chemical vapor deposition is an established method that can produce large-area and high quality samples. In this article, we investigate the geometrical and optical properties of hundreds of individual single-layer MoS2 crystallites grown on a
[...] Read more.
The growth of single-layer MoS2 with chemical vapor deposition is an established method that can produce large-area and high quality samples. In this article, we investigate the geometrical and optical properties of hundreds of individual single-layer MoS2 crystallites grown on a highly-polished sapphire substrate. Most of the crystallites are oriented along the terraces of the sapphire substrate and have an area comprised between 10 µm2 and 60 µm2. Differential reflectance measurements performed on these crystallites show that the area of the MoS2 crystallites has an influence on the position and broadening of the B exciton while the orientation does not influence the A and B excitons of MoS2. These measurements demonstrate that differential reflectance measurements have the potential to be used to characterize the homogeneity of large-area chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown samples. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Atomic Layer Growth of InSe and Sb2Se3 Layered Semiconductors and Their Heterostructure
Electronics 2017, 6(2), 27; doi:10.3390/electronics6020027
Received: 12 February 2017 / Revised: 19 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3163 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metal chalcogenides based on the C–M–M–C (C = chalcogen, M = metal) structure possess several attractive properties that can be utilized in both electrical and optical devices. We have shown that specular, large area films of γ-InSe and Sb2Se3 can
[...] Read more.
Metal chalcogenides based on the C–M–M–C (C = chalcogen, M = metal) structure possess several attractive properties that can be utilized in both electrical and optical devices. We have shown that specular, large area films of γ-InSe and Sb2Se3 can be grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD) at relatively low temperatures. Optical (absorption, Raman), crystalline (X-ray diffraction), and composition (XPS) properties of these films have been measured and compared to those reported for exfoliated films and have been found to be similar. Heterostructures composed of a layer of γ-InSe (intrinsically n-type) followed by a layer of Sb2Se3 (intrinsically p-type) that display diode characteristics were also grown. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Energetic Stabilities, Structural and Electronic Properties of Monolayer Graphene Doped with Boron and Nitrogen Atoms
Electronics 2016, 5(4), 91; doi:10.3390/electronics5040091
Received: 6 November 2016 / Revised: 23 November 2016 / Accepted: 6 December 2016 / Published: 14 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (14584 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The structural, energetic, and electronic properties of single-layer graphene doped with boron and nitrogen atoms with varying doping concentrations and configurations have been investigated here via first-principles density functional theory calculations. It was found that the band gap increases with an increase in
[...] Read more.
The structural, energetic, and electronic properties of single-layer graphene doped with boron and nitrogen atoms with varying doping concentrations and configurations have been investigated here via first-principles density functional theory calculations. It was found that the band gap increases with an increase in doping concentration, whereas the energetic stability of the doped systems decreases with an increase in doping concentration. It was observed that both the band gaps and the cohesive energies also depend on the atomic configurations considered for the substitutional dopants. Stability was found to be higher in N-doped graphene systems as compared to B-doped graphene systems. The electronic structures of B- and N-doped graphene systems were also found to be strongly influenced by the positioning of the dopant atoms in the graphene lattice. The systems with dopant atoms at alternate sublattices have been found to have the lowest cohesive energies and therefore form the most stable structures. These results indicate an ability to adjust the band gap as required using B and N atoms according to the choice of the supercell, i.e., the doping density and substitutional dopant sites, which could be useful in the design of graphene-based electronic and optical devices. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Guided Modes in a Double-Well Asymmetric Potential of a Graphene Waveguide
Electronics 2016, 5(4), 87; doi:10.3390/electronics5040087
Received: 27 October 2016 / Revised: 28 November 2016 / Accepted: 1 December 2016 / Published: 7 December 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The analogy between the electron wave nature in graphene electronics and the electromagnetic waves in dielectrics has suggested a series of optical-like phenomena, which is of great importance for graphene-based electronic devices. In this paper, we propose an asymmetric double-well potential on graphene
[...] Read more.
The analogy between the electron wave nature in graphene electronics and the electromagnetic waves in dielectrics has suggested a series of optical-like phenomena, which is of great importance for graphene-based electronic devices. In this paper, we propose an asymmetric double-well potential on graphene as an electronic waveguide to confine the graphene electrons. The guided modes in this graphene waveguide are investigated using a modified transfer matrix method. It is found that there are two types of guided modes. The first kind is confined in one well, which is similar to the asymmetric quantum well graphene waveguide. The second kind can appear in two potential wells with double-degeneracy. Characteristics of all the possible guide modes are presented. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Modeling and Design of a New Flexible Graphene-on-Silicon Schottky Junction Solar Cell
Electronics 2016, 5(4), 73; doi:10.3390/electronics5040073
Received: 5 September 2016 / Revised: 3 October 2016 / Accepted: 19 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1651 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new graphene-based flexible solar cell with a power conversion efficiency >10% has been designed. The environmental stability and the low complexity of the fabrication process are the two main advantages of the proposed device with respect to other flexible solar cells. The
[...] Read more.
A new graphene-based flexible solar cell with a power conversion efficiency >10% has been designed. The environmental stability and the low complexity of the fabrication process are the two main advantages of the proposed device with respect to other flexible solar cells. The designed solar cell is a graphene/silicon Schottky junction whose performance has been enhanced by a graphene oxide layer deposited on the graphene sheet. The effect of the graphene oxide is to dope the graphene and to act as anti-reflection coating. A silicon dioxide ultrathin layer interposed between the n-Si and the graphene increases the open-circuit voltage of the cell. The solar cell optimization has been achieved through a mathematical model, which has been validated by using experimental data reported in literature. The new flexible photovoltaic device can be integrated in a wide range of microsystems powered by solar energy. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Recent Advances in Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices Based on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
Electronics 2017, 6(2), 43; doi:10.3390/electronics6020043
Received: 16 March 2017 / Revised: 1 May 2017 / Accepted: 12 May 2017 / Published: 2 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6204 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D TMDCs) offer several attractive features for use in next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. Device applications of TMDCs have gained much research interest, and significant advancement has been recorded. In this review, the overall research advancement in electronic and
[...] Read more.
Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D TMDCs) offer several attractive features for use in next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. Device applications of TMDCs have gained much research interest, and significant advancement has been recorded. In this review, the overall research advancement in electronic and optoelectronic devices based on TMDCs are summarized and discussed. In particular, we focus on evaluating field effect transistors (FETs), photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors, lasers, and integrated circuits (ICs) using TMDCs. Full article
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Open AccessReview Photonic Structure-Integrated Two-Dimensional Material Optoelectronics
Electronics 2016, 5(4), 93; doi:10.3390/electronics5040093
Received: 25 October 2016 / Revised: 5 December 2016 / Accepted: 9 December 2016 / Published: 20 December 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1674 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The rapid development and unique properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene, phosphorene and transition metal dichalcogenides enable them to become intriguing candidates for future optoelectronic applications. To maximize the potential of 2D material-based optoelectronics, various photonic structures are integrated to form
[...] Read more.
The rapid development and unique properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene, phosphorene and transition metal dichalcogenides enable them to become intriguing candidates for future optoelectronic applications. To maximize the potential of 2D material-based optoelectronics, various photonic structures are integrated to form photonic structure/2D material hybrid systems so that the device performance can be manipulated in controllable ways. Here, we first introduce the photocurrent-generation mechanisms of 2D material-based optoelectronics and their performance. We then offer an overview and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of hybrid systems, where 2D material optoelectronics are integrated with photonic structures, especially plasmonic nanostructures, photonic waveguides and crystals. By combining with those photonic structures, the performance of 2D material optoelectronics can be further enhanced, and on the other side, a high-performance modulator can be achieved by electrostatically tuning 2D materials. Finally, 2D material-based photodetector can also become an efficient probe to learn the light-matter interactions of photonic structures. Those hybrid systems combine the advantages of 2D materials and photonic structures, providing further capacity for high-performance optoelectronics. Full article
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