Special Issue "Selenium and Tellurium Chemistry"

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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rudolf Pietschnig
Karl-Franzens-Universität, Institut für Chemie, Anorganische Chemie, Schubertstrasse 1, A-8010 Graz, Austria
E-Mail: rudolf.pietschnig@uni-graz.at

Special Issue Information

Submission

All papers should be submitted to molecules@mdpi.com with copy to the guest editor. To be published continuously until the deadline and papers will be listed together at the special websites.
Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. All papers are refereed through a peer review process. A guide for authors, sample copies and other relevant information for submitting papers are available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed monthly journal published by MDPI.
Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a paper. Open Access publication fees are 1600 CHF per paper. English correction fees (250 CHF) will be added in certain cases (1850 CHF per paper for those papers that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.).

Keywords

  • selenium
  • tellurium
  • chalcogene
  • organoselenium
  • organotellurium
  • selenoproteins
  • selenium-enrichment
  • selenium speciation
  • selenium bioavailability
  • toxicology
  • selenide
  • telluride
  • selenite
  • tellurite
  • heterocycles
  • gas phase deposition
  • CVD
  • molecular magnets
  • materials
  • 77Se nmr
  • chalcogen clusters
  • chalcogen ions
  • crystal structures

Published Papers (24 papers)

Molecules 2013, 18(10), 11705-11711; doi:10.3390/molecules181011705
Received: 29 July 2013; in revised form: 7 September 2013 / Accepted: 9 September 2013 / Published: 25 September 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(5), 5251-5264; doi:10.3390/molecules18055251
Received: 18 March 2013; in revised form: 4 April 2013 / Accepted: 25 April 2013 / Published: 8 May 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (655 KB) |  Supplementary Files
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Molecules 2013, 18(5), 5221-5234; doi:10.3390/molecules18055221
Received: 29 March 2013; in revised form: 16 April 2013 / Accepted: 27 April 2013 / Published: 7 May 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(4), 4081-4090; doi:10.3390/molecules18044081
Received: 18 February 2013; in revised form: 28 March 2013 / Accepted: 2 April 2013 / Published: 5 April 2013
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Molecules 2013, 18(3), 3292-3311; doi:10.3390/molecules18033292
Received: 3 December 2012; in revised form: 5 March 2013 / Accepted: 7 March 2013 / Published: 13 March 2013
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Molecules 2012, 17(12), 14565-14572; doi:10.3390/molecules171214565
Received: 9 November 2012; in revised form: 3 December 2012 / Accepted: 5 December 2012 / Published: 7 December 2012
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Molecules 2010, 15(4), 2357-2373; doi:10.3390/molecules15042357
Received: 10 February 2010; in revised form: 1 March 2010 / Accepted: 26 March 2010 / Published: 31 March 2010
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Molecules 2009, 14(12), 4880-4891; doi:10.3390/molecules14124880
Received: 23 October 2009; in revised form: 18 November 2009 / Accepted: 27 November 2009 / Published: 30 November 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(11), 4440-4453; doi:10.3390/molecules14114440
Received: 5 October 2009; in revised form: 2 November 2009 / Accepted: 4 November 2009 / Published: 5 November 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(11), 4337-4350; doi:10.3390/molecules14114337
Received: 27 July 2009; in revised form: 1 September 2009 / Accepted: 23 October 2009 / Published: 26 October 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(10), 3975-3988; doi:10.3390/molecules14103975
Received: 11 August 2009; in revised form: 26 September 2009 / Accepted: 30 September 2009 / Published: 12 October 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3567-3588; doi:10.3390/molecules14093567
Received: 28 July 2009; in revised form: 18 August 2009 / Accepted: 11 September 2009 / Published: 14 September 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3509-3527; doi:10.3390/molecules14093509
Received: 17 August 2009; in revised form: 3 September 2009 / Accepted: 7 September 2009 / Published: 10 September 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3367-3375; doi:10.3390/molecules14093367
Received: 31 July 2009; in revised form: 26 August 2009 / Accepted: 2 September 2009 / Published: 2 September 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3313-3338; doi:10.3390/molecules14093313
Received: 1 July 2009; in revised form: 4 August 2009 / Accepted: 27 August 2009 / Published: 1 September 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3229-3236; doi:10.3390/molecules14093229
Received: 6 August 2009; in revised form: 24 August 2009 / Accepted: 26 August 2009 / Published: 28 August 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3115-3131; doi:10.3390/molecules14093115
Received: 7 July 2009; in revised form: 15 August 2009 / Accepted: 19 August 2009 / Published: 24 August 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(7), 2555-2572; doi:10.3390/molecules14072555
Received: 3 June 2009; in revised form: 7 July 2009 / Accepted: 9 July 2009 / Published: 13 July 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(7), 2337-2344; doi:10.3390/molecules14072337
Received: 12 June 2009; in revised form: 26 June 2009 / Accepted: 30 June 2009 / Published: 1 July 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(3), 1263-1278; doi:10.3390/molecules14031263
Received: 30 January 2009; in revised form: 15 February 2009 / Accepted: 20 March 2009 / Published: 23 March 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(3), 1111-1125; doi:10.3390/molecules14031111
Received: 10 February 2009; in revised form: 10 March 2009 / Accepted: 11 March 2009 / Published: 12 March 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(3), 904-916; doi:10.3390/molecules14030904
Received: 1 November 2008; in revised form: 17 December 2008 / Accepted: 23 December 2008 / Published: 25 February 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(2), 884-892; doi:10.3390/molecules14020884
Received: 18 December 2008; in revised form: 13 February 2009 / Accepted: 19 February 2009 / Published: 23 February 2009
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Molecules 2009, 14(1), 141-159; doi:10.3390/molecules14010141
Received: 28 October 2008; in revised form: 8 December 2008 / Accepted: 8 December 2008 / Published: 31 December 2008
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title:
Role of Selenium in Vascular Health and Disease
Authors: Lorraine M. Sordillo*, Chris M. Corl, and Stacey L. Aitken
*Corresponding author: Lorraine M. Sordillo, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
E-mail: sordillo@msu.edu
Abstract: Selenium is an essential trace element that is known to play a beneficial role in both human and animal health. Considerable epidemiologic data exists to support the concept that various forms of selenium can protect against many types of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and several other inflammatory-based diseases. The metabolism of selenium in mammals is determined largely by the dietary sources (organic or inorganic) and most of the protective effects of selenium are postulated to be due to either its metabolism into methylated selenocompounds or its incorporation into selenoproteins. Endothelial cell dysfunction is linked with the development of many diseases and one way that selenium may influence health is by the ability to maintain vascular homeostasis. This review will describe the potential molecular mechanisms of how selenocompounds and selenoproteins can impact vascular function and mammalian health.

Manuscript ID: molecules-selenium-20081028-jp-Sugimoto
Type of Paper: Review
Title: Selenium-Substituted Ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalenothioquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide Donor Molecules
Authors: Toyonari Sugimoto *, Toshiki Hayashi, Xunwen Xiao, Yuhta Yamaji and Xiangfeng Shao
Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University
Abstract: Ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalenothioquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide and its quinone derivative are such useful donor molecules that their charge-transfer (CT) salts with magnetic FeX4- (X = Cl, Br) ions give one ferromagnetic molecular semiconductor and four antiferromagnetic molecular metals with significant p-d interaction between conducting p electrons and localized d spins. A selenium atom has a larger van der Waals radius than oxygen and sulfur atoms, so selenium-substituted derivatives of the thioquinone and quinone donor molecules are expected to bring about much more stabilization of metallic state as well as stronger p-d interaction, by which an unprecedented ferromagnetic molecular metal working at reasonable temperatures could be realized. The sulfur atoms at different positions of the thioquinone donor molecule are substituted with selenium atoms using newly-developed synthetic methods to give new donor molecules with an ethylenediselena group in place of an ethylenedithio group, with a selenone group in place of a thione group, with 1,3-diselenole group in place of a 1,3-dithiole group and with selenium atoms in place of some of four sulfur atoms in a central tetrathiaethylene group, respectively. This review summarizes molecular structures and pysical properties of thses selenium donor molecules, and also crystal structures and electrical conducting/magnetic properties of their CT salts with FeX4- ions.

Manuscript ID: molecules-selchem-20081103-cy-Odysseos
Type of Paper: Review
Title: Selenium in Cancer Prevention and Therapeutics: One Element, many Targets
Author: Andreani D.Odysseos
Affiliation: EPOS-Iasis, R&D, Nicosia, Cyprus
E-mail: andreani@epos-iasis.com
Abstract: The past decade has experienced the evolution of a promising group of selective agents comprised of organic Selenium compounds. Eventhough the critical Se metabolite hypothesis has steadily gained both in vivo and in vitro support, much remains debatable as to what mechanisms account for the cancer preventive activity of Selenium. This review highlights the propensities of these agents to modulate critical signals and affect selectively a multitude of molecular targets in premalignant and malignant lesions. It further provides an insight into how modifications of their structural characteristics may alter dramatically their biological activities due to the evolution of signal-generating active intermediates and metabolites. Mechanisms address key elements such as the organ site specificity, the selectivity against transformed phenotype, the forms and effective doses of Se and the responsive carcinogenesis stages and molecular targets.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: From Selenium to Tellurium Based Glass Optical Fibers for Infrared Spectroscopies
Authors: Shuo Cui, Catherine Boussard-Plédel, Johann Troles, Virginie Nazabal, Laurent Brilland and Bruno Bureau
Affiliations: Glass and Ceramics, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR-CNRS 6226, Campus de Beaulieu, Université de Rennes 1, France
Abstract: Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements. Among them, selenide glasses are especially interesting due to their wide transparency in the mid-infrared. Moreover, their thermo-mechanical properties make them easy to shape into optical devices such as optical fibers. These fibers are under development for about ten years in our group mainly to carry out Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS) experiments. Thanks to these selenide glass fibers, some fruitful results were obtained in particular in medical and environmental applications. At the same period, some double index single mode fibers were also fabricated permitting to observe and filter infrared signal at 10 µm. Then, more recently, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. These both optical devices aim at creating sources emitting in the mid-infrared which is a real issue for mid-infrared spectroscopies. In parallel the telluride glass family has been revisited for far-infrared spectroscopy. New glass compositions were discovered only based on tellurium. Due to its heaviness, tellurium based glasses transmit light further in the infrared. They have given rise to innovating optical fibers enabling to observe the CO2 absorption band spreading around 15 µm in the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA). In this paper the author propose a review on the recent results get on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

Last update: 4 February 2013

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