E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Essential Oils as Antimicrobial and Anti-infectious Agents"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Daniela Rigano

Department of Pharmacy, University Federico II of Naples, via D. Montesano 49, CAP 80131, Naples, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products; essential oils; GC-MS; NMR
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Adriana Basile

Department of Biological Sciences—Plant Biology Section, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples 80126, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: antimicrobial activity; bioaccumulation; antifungal activity; lichen

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In last few decades, infectious diseases have continued to be a major health concern worldwide, causing important epidemiological, financial, and logistical implications. The use of many conventional drugs is hampered by a lack of efficacy, emergence of resistance, adverse effects, and high costs. Thus, new strategies and therapeutic alternatives are required: Essential oils (EOs) are, today, considered as an important source for new natural antimicrobials, particularly on multidrug-resistant bacteria, pathogenic fungi, viruses, and parasites. Considering the wide variety of chemical compounds occurring in EOs, it is likely that their antimicrobial activities are attributable to the combination of several mechanisms of action on different parts of the microbial cell, and this is probably the reason why bacteria do not develop resistance. EOs may provide an interesting option to replace the use of conventional antimicrobials with a low cost and safe medicinal, or could be used in addition to them in order to decrease their potential risk of toxicity.

This Special Issue aims to attract contributions on all aspects of the chemistry and antimicrobial activity of essential oils. There is still the challenge to further explore the range of their biological effects and their potential applications as antibiotic and anti-infectious agents.

Prof. Dr. Daniela Rigano
Prof. Dr. Adriana Basile
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • essential oils
  • antimicrobials
  • bacterial infections
  • fungi
  • viruses
  • parasites
  • resistance

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Chemical Composition, Antibacterial Activity, and Synergistic Effects with Conventional Antibiotics and Nitric Oxide Production Inhibitory Activity of Essential Oil from Geophila repens (L.) I.M. Johnst
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1561; doi:10.3390/molecules22091561
Received: 24 August 2017 / Revised: 13 September 2017 / Accepted: 14 September 2017 / Published: 17 September 2017
PDF Full-text (402 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Geophila repens (L.) I.M. Johnst, a perennial herb, belongs to the Rubiaceae family. In this study, we identified the chemical composition of the Geophila repens essential oil (GR-EO) for the first time. Totally, seventy-seven compounds were identified according to GC and GC-MS, which
[...] Read more.
Geophila repens (L.) I.M. Johnst, a perennial herb, belongs to the Rubiaceae family. In this study, we identified the chemical composition of the Geophila repens essential oil (GR-EO) for the first time. Totally, seventy-seven compounds were identified according to GC and GC-MS, which represent 98.0% of the oil. And the major components of GR-EO were β-caryophyllene (23.3%), β-elemene (8.0%), farnesyl butanoate (7.4%), myrcene (3.5%), and trans-nerolidol (3.3%). Then we evaluated the antibacterial activities of GR-EO and the synergistic effects of GR-EO in combination with commercial antibiotics using the microdilution and Checkerboard method. The results demonstrated that GR-EO possessed an excellent broad spectrum antibacterial activity, especially against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis. It also showed that the combined application of GR-EO with antibiotics led to synergistic effects in most cases. And the most prominent synergistic effect was noticed when GR-EO was in combination with Streptomycin and tested against Escherichia coli (fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) of 0.13). Additionally, the results of a Griess assay revealed that GR-EO exhibited a potent inhibitory effect on NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 (murine macrophage) cells. In conclusion, the combination of GR-EO and the commercial antibiotics has significant potential for the development of new antimicrobial treatment and reduction of drug resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Essential Oils as Antimicrobial and Anti-infectious Agents)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication In Vitro Evaluation of Sub-Lethal Concentrations of Plant-Derived Antifungal Compounds on FUSARIA Growth and Mycotoxin Production
Molecules 2017, 22(8), 1271; doi:10.3390/molecules22081271
Received: 22 June 2017 / Revised: 25 July 2017 / Accepted: 27 July 2017 / Published: 29 July 2017
PDF Full-text (2380 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Phytopathogenic fungi can lead to significant cereal yield losses, also producing mycotoxins dangerous for human and animal health. The fungal control based on the use of synthetic fungicides can be complemented by "green" methods for crop protection, based on the use of natural
[...] Read more.
Phytopathogenic fungi can lead to significant cereal yield losses, also producing mycotoxins dangerous for human and animal health. The fungal control based on the use of synthetic fungicides can be complemented by "green" methods for crop protection, based on the use of natural products. In this frame, the antifungal activities of bergamot and lemon essential oils and of five natural compounds recurrent in essential oils (citronellal, citral, cinnamaldehyde, cuminaldehyde and limonene) have been evaluated against three species of mycotoxigenic fungi (Fusarium sporotrichioides, F. graminearum and F. langsethiae) responsible for Fusarium Head Blight in small-grain cereals. The natural products concentrations effective for reducing or inhibiting the in vitro fungal growth were determined for each fungal species and the following scale of potency was found: cinnamaldehyde > cuminaldehyde > citral > citronellal > bergamot oil > limonene > lemon oil. Moreover, the in vitro mycotoxin productions of the three Fusaria strains exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of the seven products was evaluated. The three fungal species showed variability in response to the treatments, both in terms of inhibition of mycelial growth and in terms of modulation of mycotoxin production that can be enhanced by sub-lethal concentrations of some natural products. This last finding must be taken into account in the frame of an open field application of some plant-derived fungicides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Essential Oils as Antimicrobial and Anti-infectious Agents)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Cardamom, Cumin, and Dill Weed Essential Oils: Chemical Compositions, Antimicrobial Activities, and Mechanisms of Action against Campylobacter spp.
Molecules 2017, 22(7), 1191; doi:10.3390/molecules22071191
Received: 16 June 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 13 July 2017 / Published: 15 July 2017
PDF Full-text (971 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Natural antimicrobials as well as essential oils (EOs) have gained interest to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms and to control food borne diseases. Campylobacter spp. are one of the most common causative agents of gastroenteritis. In this study, cardamom, cumin, and dill weed EOs were
[...] Read more.
Natural antimicrobials as well as essential oils (EOs) have gained interest to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms and to control food borne diseases. Campylobacter spp. are one of the most common causative agents of gastroenteritis. In this study, cardamom, cumin, and dill weed EOs were evaluated for their antibacterial activities against Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by using agar-well diffusion and broth microdilution methods, along with the mechanisms of antimicrobial action. Chemical compositions of EOs were also tested by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed that cardamom and dill weed EOs possess greater antimicrobial activity than cumin with larger inhibition zones and lower minimum inhibitory concentrations. The permeability of cell membrane and cell membrane integrity were evaluated by determining relative electric conductivity and release of cell constituents into supernatant at 260 nm, respectively. Moreover, effect of EOs on the cell membrane of Campylobacter spp. was also investigated by measuring extracellular ATP concentration. Increase of relative electric conductivity, extracellular ATP concentration, and cell constituents’ release after treatment with EOs demonstrated that tested EOs affected the membrane integrity of Campylobacter spp. The results supported high efficiency of cardamom, cumin, and dill weed EOs to inhibit Campylobacter spp. by impairing the bacterial cell membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Essential Oils as Antimicrobial and Anti-infectious Agents)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top