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Special Issue "Medicinal Plants and Diabetes"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Oluwafemi Oguntibeju

Phytomedicine and Diabetes Research Group, Oxidative Stress Research Centre, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535, South Africa
Website | E-Mail
Interests: diabetes; diabetic complications; oxidative stress; medicinal plants; obesity; diabetes-related cardiovascular disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major public health burden, increasing dramatically with 25% of global population believed to be diabetic. It has been predicted that over 552 million people will be diabetic with the projection that 1 in 10 non-diabetic adults will become diabetic by 2030. Plants with medicinal values are known to play significant role globally particularly in African and Asian regions in the management and treatment of various chronic diseases including diabetes. In African and Asian regions, due to low socio-economic patterns, about 80% of these populations predominantly depend on plant products as their primary healthcare sources. The interest in medicinal plants has grown possibly due to their availability, accessibility and the general belief that they demonstrate minimum side effects. The relative cost of pharmacological drugs globally has raised concerns of diversion from orthodox medicines to herbal remedies. The treatment and management cost of DM in developing countries is expensive and majority of the population cannot afford, hence the heavy reliance on medicinal plants for the management several chronic diseases including diabetes mellitus. Over a thousand plant species have been used in the treatment and management of diabetes. Therapeutic effects of plant extracts have been linked to the presence of phytochemicals, such as glycosides, alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, cartenoids, beta glycans and caretoniods and that the bioactive constituents provide therapeutic effects either by combating reactive oxygen species or acting as hypoglycaemic, anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-inflammatory and apoptotic agents. This Special Issue of the journal will focus on diabetes in general and diabetes and the role of medicinal plants in the treatment and management of diabetes.

Prof. Oluwafemi Oguntibeju
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus and medicinal plants
  • Diabetes and oxidative stress
  • Medicinal plants and obesity
  • Oxidative stress and medicinal plants
  • Diabetic complications and medicinal plants
  • Bone health-related diabetes complications and medicinal plants
  • Toxicity and medicinal plants
  • Diabetes-related inflammation and medicinal plants
  • Diabetic-related apoptosis and medicinal plants

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Antidiabetic Effect of Cyclocarya paliurus Leaves Depends on the Contents of Antihyperglycemic Flavonoids and Antihyperlipidemic Triterpenoids
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 1042; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051042
Received: 16 April 2018 / Revised: 24 April 2018 / Accepted: 29 April 2018 / Published: 29 April 2018
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Abstract
Cyclocarya paliurus has been used commonly to treat diabetes in China. However, the effective components and the effect of plant origin remain unclear. In this study, C. paliurus leaves with different chemical compositions were selected from five geographical locations, and their effects on
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Cyclocarya paliurus has been used commonly to treat diabetes in China. However, the effective components and the effect of plant origin remain unclear. In this study, C. paliurus leaves with different chemical compositions were selected from five geographical locations, and their effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were evaluated with both ethanol and aqueous extracts. Glucose levels, lipid levels, and biomarkers of liver and kidney function were measured. The principal components of both C. paliurus ethanol and aqueous extracts from different geographical locations differed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results showed that C. paliurus extracts with better antihyperglycemic effects were characterized by higher contents of total flavonoids, especially quercetin-3-O-glucuronide and kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide. Furthermore, significantly negative correlations were found between triterpenoids contents and lipid levels. These results revealed the potential antihyperglycemic capacity of C. paliurus flavonoids and the antihyperlipidemic effect of C. paliurus triterpenoids. Thus, we suggest that the composition of C. paliurus compounds might help to design therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, geographic origins and the extraction solvents can also affect the effectiveness of the treatment as these factors influence the chemical compositions and thereby the biological activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Diabetes)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Anti-Diabetic Effects of Acankoreagenin from the Leaves of Acanthopanax Gracilistylus Herb in RIN-m5F Cells via Suppression of NF-κB Activation
Molecules 2018, 23(4), 958; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040958
Received: 27 March 2018 / Revised: 13 April 2018 / Accepted: 16 April 2018 / Published: 19 April 2018
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Abstract
Diabetes mellitus is a chronic degenerative disease that causes long-term complications and represents a serious public health problem. In this manuscript, acankoreagenin isolated from the leaves of Acanthopanax gracilistylus (LAG) is thought to possess excellent anti-diabetic properties. In vitro, anti-diabetic activities were assessed
[...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus is a chronic degenerative disease that causes long-term complications and represents a serious public health problem. In this manuscript, acankoreagenin isolated from the leaves of Acanthopanax gracilistylus (LAG) is thought to possess excellent anti-diabetic properties. In vitro, anti-diabetic activities were assessed based on the inhibitory activities with α-glucosidase (IC50 13.01 μM), α-amylase (IC50 30.81 μM), and PTP1B (IC50 16.39 μM). Acankoreagenin showed better anti-diabetic effects. Then, an investigation was performed to analyze the insulin secretion effects of the insulin-secreting cell line in RIN-m5F cells. It was found that acankoreagenin could increase the insulin release in RIN-m5F cells. It was also found that acankoreagenin reduced NO production, activity of caspase-3, and the reactive oxygen species levels in the cells injured by processing of cytokines. In western blotting, inactivation of NF-κB signaling was confirmed. Acankoreagenin (20 μM) showed a higher I-κBα expression and lower NF-κB expression than the control group and showed a better expression than the positive control L-NAME (1 mM) (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates the anti-diabetic effects of acankoreagenin in vitro and suggests acankoreagenin might offer therapeutic potential for treating diabetes mellitus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Diabetes)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Proteomic Analysis of Differentially-Expressed Proteins in the Liver of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with Parkia biglobosa Protein Isolate
Molecules 2018, 23(2), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23020156
Received: 29 October 2017 / Revised: 26 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
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Abstract
Protein isolate from Parkia biglobosa seeds is believed to possess excellent anti-diabetic properties. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins in liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with Parkia biglobosa seeds protein isolate (PBPi). In this study, total proteins
[...] Read more.
Protein isolate from Parkia biglobosa seeds is believed to possess excellent anti-diabetic properties. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins in liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with Parkia biglobosa seeds protein isolate (PBPi). In this study, total proteins extracted from rat liver were separated on one-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gel (1D SDS-PAGE) and stained with Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) to visualize protein bands. We observed that protein bands in the region of 10–15 kDa were altered by the different treatments; these bands were selected and excised for in-gel digestion and peptide extraction followed by nLC-MS, MALDI-TOF MS, and LIFT MS/MS. A database search with the Mascot algorithm positively identified four differentially expressed proteins. These proteins are known to be responsible for diverse biological functions within various organs and tissues. The present result gives insight and understanding into possible molecular mechanisms by which streptozotocin causes various alterations in proteins found in the liver of diabetic rats and the possible modulatory role of PBPi in the management of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Diabetes)
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Open AccessArticle The Benefits of the Citrus Flavonoid Diosmin on Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells under High-Glucose Conditions
Molecules 2017, 22(12), 2251; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22122251
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 2 December 2017 / Accepted: 8 December 2017 / Published: 18 December 2017
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Abstract
We investigate diosmin for its effect on the ARPE-19 human retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to high glucose, a model of diabetic retinopathy (DR). After incubation for 4 days with a normal (5 mmol/L) concentration of D-glucose, ARPE-19 cells were exposed separately to
[...] Read more.
We investigate diosmin for its effect on the ARPE-19 human retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to high glucose, a model of diabetic retinopathy (DR). After incubation for 4 days with a normal (5 mmol/L) concentration of D-glucose, ARPE-19 cells were exposed separately to normal or high concentrations of D-glucose (30 mmol/L) with or without diosmin at different concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 μg/mL) for another 48 h. Next, we assessed cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and antioxidant enzyme activities. In order to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms, we meanwhile analyzed the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, total and phosphorylated JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Diosmin dose dependently enhanced cell viability following high glucose treatment in ARPE-19 cells. The activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the levels of reduced glutathione were decreased, while it was observed that levels of ROS in high glucose cultured ARPE-19 cells increased. High glucose also disturbed Bax and Bcl-2 expression, interrupted Bcl-2/Bax balance, and triggered subsequent cytochrome c release into the cytosol and activation of caspase-3. These detrimental effects were ameliorated dose dependently by diosmin. Furthermore, diosmin could abrogate high glucose-induced apoptosis as well as JNK and P38 MAPK phosphorylation in ARPE-19 cells. Our results suggest that treatment ARPE-19 cells with diosmin halts hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative damage and thus this compound may be a candidate for preventing the visual impairment caused by DR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Diabetes)
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