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Special Issue "Phospholipids: Structure and Function"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Mu-Ping Nieh

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, Unit 3136, Storrs, CT-06269-3136, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomembranes; well-defined lipid nanoparticles; self-sssembly; nanostructural charatcerization (scattering); therapeutic/diagnostic nanocarriers; lipid transfer; polymer/lipid and inorganic nanoparticle/lipid interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lipids are the building blocks of biological membranes, which define the boundary, control the transport, and host the functional-associated proteins of cells or organelles. Because of their amphiphilic properties and biological compatibility, lipids have also been used as delivery nanocarriers for therapeutics or diagnostics in various forms of structures, such as liposomes, solid nanoparticles, or micelles. Generally speaking, multiple lipid species are found in biomembranes or are used in the constituents of nanoparticles. The aforementioned functions and applications often depend on the structures/morphology of the associated lipid species (e.g., segregation, self-assembly and lipid/protein complex), which can be controlled by their molecular architectures (spontaneous curvature), hydrophobic–hydrophilic interactions, crystallinity of the acyl chains, charge densities, bilayer rigidity, and salinity of the solution. Therefore, the structure–function relationship is important for advancing our knowledge of related biological functions and the formation mechanism of well-defined lipid self-assembling nanoparticles. The Special Issue aims at (1) experimental characterization, theory and simulation on the structures of bilayer membranes or nanoparticles made of lipid mixtures, (2) novel approaches on accessing the functions of biomembranes, and (3) correlation between functions and lipid structures.

Prof. Mu-Ping Nieh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lipids
  • Morphology
  • Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Interfaces
  • Liposomes
  • Biomembrane
  • Characterization
  • Function
  • Lipid Nanoparticles
  • Fluidity
  • Charge Density

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Differential Interaction of Antimicrobial Peptides with Lipid Structures Studied by Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1775; doi:10.3390/molecules22101775
Received: 30 August 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
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Abstract
In this work; we investigated the differential interaction of amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid structures by means of extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By using a coarse-grained (CG) model within the MARTINI force field; we simulated the peptide–lipid system from three different
[...] Read more.
In this work; we investigated the differential interaction of amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid structures by means of extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By using a coarse-grained (CG) model within the MARTINI force field; we simulated the peptide–lipid system from three different initial configurations: (a) peptides in water in the presence of a pre-equilibrated lipid bilayer; (b) peptides inside the hydrophobic core of the membrane; and (c) random configurations that allow self-assembled molecular structures. This last approach allowed us to sample the structural space of the systems and consider cooperative effects. The peptides used in our simulations are aurein 1.2 and maculatin 1.1; two well-known antimicrobial peptides from the Australian tree frogs; and molecules that present different membrane-perturbing behaviors. Our results showed differential behaviors for each type of peptide seen in a different organization that could guide a molecular interpretation of the experimental data. While both peptides are capable of forming membrane aggregates; the aurein 1.2 ones have a pore-like structure and exhibit a higher level of organization than those conformed by maculatin 1.1. Furthermore; maculatin 1.1 has a strong tendency to form clusters and induce curvature at low peptide–lipid ratios. The exploration of the possible lipid–peptide structures; as the one carried out here; could be a good tool for recognizing specific configurations that should be further studied with more sophisticated methodologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phospholipids: Structure and Function)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Bioactivity In Vitro of Quercetin Glycoside Obtained in Beauveria bassiana Culture and Its Interaction with Liposome Membranes
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1520; doi:10.3390/molecules22091520
Received: 30 July 2017 / Revised: 10 September 2017 / Accepted: 10 September 2017 / Published: 11 September 2017
PDF Full-text (1404 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Quercetin (Q) was used as substrate for regioselective glycosylation at the C-7 position catalyzed by Beauveria bassiana AM278 strain. As a result the glycoside quercetin 7-O-β-d-(4″-O-methyl)glucopyranoside (Q 7-MeGlu) was formed. The goal of the studies was to
[...] Read more.
Quercetin (Q) was used as substrate for regioselective glycosylation at the C-7 position catalyzed by Beauveria bassiana AM278 strain. As a result the glycoside quercetin 7-O-β-d-(4″-O-methyl)glucopyranoside (Q 7-MeGlu) was formed. The goal of the studies was to determine the anti-oxidative (liposome membrane protection against free radicals IC50Q 7-MeGlu = 5.47 and IC50Q = 4.49 µM) and anti-inflammatory (COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes activity inhibition) properties of Q 7-MeGlu as compared to Q. Every attempt was made to clarify the antioxidant activity of these molecules, which are able to interact with egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes, using a fluorometric method (by applying the probes MC540, TMA-DPH and DPH). The results indicated that Q 7-MeGlu and Q are responsible for increasing the packing order, mainly in the hydrophilic but also in hydrophobic regions of the membrane (Q > Q 7-MeGlu). These observations, confirmed by a 1H-NMR method, are key to understanding their antioxidant activity which is probably caused by the stabilizing effect on the lipid membranes. The results showed that Q 7-MeGlu and Q have ability to quench the human serum albumin (HSA) intrinsic fluorescence through a static quenching mechanism. The results of thermodynamic parameters indicated that the process of formation complexes between studied molecules and HSA was spontaneous and caused through Van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phospholipids: Structure and Function)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Phospholipids of Animal and Marine Origin: Structure, Function, and Anti-Inflammatory Properties
Molecules 2017, 22(11), 1964; doi:10.3390/molecules22111964
Received: 20 October 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 11 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
PDF Full-text (1809 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review paper, the latest literature on the functional properties of phospholipids in relation to inflammation and inflammation-related disorders has been critically appraised and evaluated. The paper is divided into three sections: Section 1 presents an overview of the relationship between structures
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In this review paper, the latest literature on the functional properties of phospholipids in relation to inflammation and inflammation-related disorders has been critically appraised and evaluated. The paper is divided into three sections: Section 1 presents an overview of the relationship between structures and biological activities (pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory) of several phospholipids with respect to inflammation. Section 2 and Section 3 are dedicated to the structures, functions, compositions and anti-inflammatory properties of dietary phospholipids from animal and marine sources. Most of the dietary phospholipids of animal origin come from meat, egg and dairy products. To date, there is very limited work published on meat phospholipids, undoubtedly due to the negative perception that meat consumption is an unhealthy option because of its putative associations with several chronic diseases. These assumptions are addressed with respect to the phospholipid composition of meat products. Recent research trends indicate that dairy phospholipids possess anti-inflammatory properties, which has led to an increased interest into their molecular structures and reputed health benefits. Finally, the structural composition of phospholipids of marine origin is discussed. Extensive research has been published in relation to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and inflammation, however this research has recently come under scrutiny and has proved to be unreliable and controversial in terms of the therapeutic effects of ω-3 PUFA, which are generally in the form of triglycerides and esters. Therefore, this review focuses on recent publications concerning marine phospholipids and their structural composition and related health benefits. Finally, the strong nutritional value of dietary phospholipids are highlighted with respect to marine and animal origin and avenues for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phospholipids: Structure and Function)
Figures

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